How to Split up these trumpet parts?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by SiegelTrumpet12, May 20, 2009.

  1. SiegelTrumpet12

    SiegelTrumpet12 New Friend

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    May 20, 2009
    so for marching band this year, I've been put in charge of splitting trumpet parts of. We have exactly 20 trumpets. On the 1st and 3rd movements of our show, there 3 parts. But, the first trumpet part is split into two parts a little over half of the time (evenly throughout). So it's really 1A, 1B, 2, and 3. How would you have the best balance with these parts?
    On the ballad and the closer, there are only 3 trumpet parts. How would you split that up?
    Thanks a ton!
    -Mt2
     
  2. brassplayer

    brassplayer Pianissimo User

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    As someone who has arranged for marching band, I'd say that it's difficult to make a recommendation without looking at the actual score. Since Trumpet 1 is divisi for a good chunk of the piece, the obvious answer is to assign more players to Trumpet 1 than to Trumpet 2 and 3. However, if Trumpet 2 and 3 move quite independently of Trumpet 1, then you don't want to deplete those sections so much that you shortchange those parts.

    Once again, it's really all dictated by the score. I'd probably get your director's input on this one.
     
  3. SiegelTrumpet12

    SiegelTrumpet12 New Friend

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    May 20, 2009
    All right, thanks brass player.
     
  4. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I would really mix it up to make sure that all of the capable players get a chance AND all have an opportunity to stay reasonably fresh. Blowing lead for a whole marching gig is the stuff that beat up chops are made of. Divide that stuff up. It is a TRUMPET SECTION not FIRST, SECOND and THIRD sections. I'll bet ALL of them work harder too!
     
  5. Sturmbill

    Sturmbill Pianissimo User

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    The band I have taught for the last 28 years usually breaks the players up into a split where there are more on 1st than the other two parts. The idea is that as Rowuk states, playing lead for a whole show is tough unless you're in outstanding shape. More guys sharing the load makes the work easier and you have the reserves when you need it. Also, you are better able to cover 1a/1b splits without weakening the other two parts.

    Last year we had 75 trumpets and we had between 32-35 on first. This was in a band of about 380 winds and 40 percussion ( JMU School of Music: Ensembles: Marching Royal Dukes ).

    But by all means, run it by you director!

    Bill
     
  6. SiegelTrumpet12

    SiegelTrumpet12 New Friend

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    May 20, 2009
    I very much agree with you, Rowuk. As it is not my section, I am not the section leader, I cannot freely speak this without others thinking I'm trying to "take control" of the section. I do, however, have the most musical knowledge in the section, and that's why I've been put in charge of assigning parts.
    But yes. We're a highly competitive band, and I want us, as a section, to be fresh during the entire show. The first trumpet part is very demanding, with high C's covering the whole of the closer, and double G's and one double C to close the show off. I, and the two other section members who need to be able to accomplish this, will not be able to pull this feat with out chops in bad shape from the show.
    I do have a question for you, though. There's a freshman coming in with lots of talent, and I'd like to give him first part on parts of the show. But many are reacting negatively to this, because they all played 3rd as a freshman. What do you think and how should I handle this?
     
  7. SiegelTrumpet12

    SiegelTrumpet12 New Friend

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    May 20, 2009
    Haha, wow. 35 firsts? Holy crap.
    We do believe in the magical musical pyramid, though. The set up we came up with initially was 3 on 1a, 3 on 1b, 6 on 2nd, and 8 on third. But that's a little top heavy, is it not? It is according to the trumpet sectionalist. How would you change that?
     
  8. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    no double Gs. Double G is 2 octaves above the staff (higher than double C). I question the need for a double C on the field. That is not a note that carries very well in free space. With a wailing brass section, no chance of it being heard without a microphone.

    I wrote what I think. The responsibility is to the show not the egos of some players. If the parts are divided up, everybody gets their chance - if they earn it. Why shouldn't a highly qualified freshman get a chance? The end product gets better when everybody is pulling in the same directlion. I have a great time with critics. I let them audition and qualify on their own merits. That normally shuts them up real fast.
     
  9. SiegelTrumpet12

    SiegelTrumpet12 New Friend

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    May 20, 2009
    I usually start "highs" at G that sits on top of the staff. So I was speaking of G right below double C. I appologize.
    The changes in the chords are just speculation. We've said we've put a double C on something, then ended up not doing it, so it probably won't carry though, I was just trying to get my point accross. I'll keep what you said in mind though, thanks.

    And I agree with you very much.
     

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