How to tell if you are playing in time

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by hhsTrumpet, Jan 10, 2012.

  1. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    Keeping steady time happens when you internalize the beat. Practicing with a metronome is the best way to do this. Do it a lot everyday. try playing without the metronome. If you are unsure if you are keeping steady time, go back to th emetronome. Do this until you can tell when you time "feels" steady. Remmber I said steady time. You are not trying to be machine or as rigid as a metronome. That doesn't sound musical. All good musicians will have small changes in the tempo as they play. But not the big speeding up and slowing down that in unmusical. Unless the music calls for it.
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    You don't.

    I think it is a myth to think that alone, with no help, someone that hasn't developed "groove" can find it. I will contend that you don't even develop rhythm with a metronome - if that is where you start, you only learn to follow! Your head is for creative, not mechanical.

    You develop rhythm in ensemble playing. You can then reinforce it at home with intelligent practice with a metronome (even a free one to download for a mobile phone or computer). Just like intonation is not learned with a tuner, forget the metronome as a SOLUTION for rhythm.
     
  3. Chuck Cox

    Chuck Cox Forte User

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    Follow the drummer or keyboard. You need to be together even if you're both " off ". I stopped following the guy up front with 1 stick years ago.
     
  4. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    The metronome is very helpful as a way of evaluating where you are playing ahead or behind tempo. If you are arriving too early or too late on beats you should be able to hear that. Then you can go back and listen for where in the rhythm you have begun to rush or retard your rhythm. That is, if you are arriving on beat three of a measure late, where before that, did you slow the rhythm and why. Was it problems with a rhythmic figure, or a slow tongue or fingers? Then you know better if the problem was really one of tempo or something that was extra-tempo and you work on whatever it was, accordingly.

    Tempo has to be internalised and I believe the metronome can help with that. But the real metronome is inside you. In some respect it's physical. That's why some advocate toe or foot tapping. Something to coordinate you physically to the tempo.
     
  5. Chuck Cox

    Chuck Cox Forte User

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    Most advanced trumpet players that I know practice their part slowly to get the fingerings/rhythms, then we get it to the point that we can play it faster than it is written. If I can play it faster, then I KNOW that I can play it slower. Some of the pros in here can rip through most things without much (if any) rehearsing. It's like, ya know, I want my surgeon to be able to do it great the first time ( that's what we get from pros ). I myself can play most anything straight through without gakking it. Unfortunately, it doesn't get much better than that after rehearsing !! One more thing, you'll get to the point that you will feel the beat without tapping your heel or toe ( I tend to sway slightly even now ).
     
  6. bumblebee

    bumblebee Fortissimo User

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    I find myself "singing" or "humming" the whole piece along in my head, which makes counting rests easier and helps me cue my own entrances and keep the right feel of the rythm. When I was younger I found counting rests tricky, and I would rush back in to playing with inaccurate timing and some extra tension to boot.

    --bumblebee
     
  7. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    With some songs I get the tempo and rhythm in my head ... and my Docs won't give me any med that will get rid of it. When you're playing by sticks (drummer or conductor's baton) the tempo and rythymn is given you. Listening to others play the same song you may soon need meds also. Otherwise, and alone, I feel you are at liberty to play at whatever tempo and rhythm you feel works for you. I now get a very subtle laugh when I see music marked "moderato" which I remember my Mother telling me meant somewhere between slow and fast. I now play such generally give or take 120 BPM. I've played many songs at a tempo of 440 BPM and faster. Even Flight of the Bumble Bee begins to loose it's identity when played entirely in less than a minute, but as Chuck Cox stated, when one is able to play a song faster, it's always easy to play it slower. I'm just not about to ever again play a euphonium drone of a whole note tied for 8 measures, but I did do it once in one breath. Thankfully, I now won't hear it played except during Christmas festivities.
     
  8. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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  9. Chuck Cox

    Chuck Cox Forte User

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    Gary (Gmonady) don't need no stinkin' metronome. He says " follow me boys " and takes off.
     
  10. Chuck Cox

    Chuck Cox Forte User

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    And Darten...one more thing. I want to play your Couesnon Flugelhorn.
     

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