How we breathe

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Mark_Kindy, Feb 19, 2012.

  1. Mark_Kindy

    Mark_Kindy Mezzo Forte User

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    So that we don't hijack a thread any more than necessary:

    Any doctors want to go through the muscular involvement of breathing?
    Including the role of the diaphram and subsidiary muscles, how we exhale at a faster rate, control of breathing.
     
  2. nordlandstrompet

    nordlandstrompet Forte User

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    If you want to SEE how a perfect breathing should be executed in perfection,
    look at a sleeping baby. Adapt that....
     
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    If you want to breathe better, don't study breathing, just work with someone that does it right. The path to successful playing through intellect is MUCH thornier than through emulation. The problem is that there is a bit of truth everywhere and that means making decisions that we are not ready for.

    Alexander Technique, Yoga, martial arts, swimming are all much better ways than letting yourself be distracted by whether this or that muscle is moving in the right direction.

    This approach means that we post less "advice" but offer a less dangerous approach.

    Just for the geekiness............. Diaphragm is to suck in air. Abs force it back out (if you really want to do that). Messed up body use negates better breathing, so Alexander Technique, Yoga, martial arts, swimming are all much better ways than letting yourself be distracted by whether this or that muscle is moving in the right direction. Oh, sorry, I repeated my self.............
     
  4. vern

    vern Piano User

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    Not within my speciality, but here's a simple explanation:

    During inspiration, contraction of the diaphragm pulls the lower surfaces of the lungs downward as the pressure in the intrathoracic cavity decreases. Then, during expiration, the diaphragm simply RELAXES and the elastic recoil of the lungs chest wall and abdominal structures compresses the lungs. During heavy breathing (ie. trumpet playing) the elastic forces are not powerful enough to cause the necessary rapid expiration, so that this is achieved mainly by contraction of the abdominal muscles, which forces the abdominal contents upward against the bottom of the diaphragm.

    Note that contraction of the diaphragm causes INSPIRATION and its relaxation causes EXPIRATION.
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2012
  5. Mark_Kindy

    Mark_Kindy Mezzo Forte User

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    Yes, this is for geekiness purposes, and thank you Rowuk for your post. Perhaps I put this is in the wrong category (on second thought), though it pertains to trumpet on some level...
    Thank you vern, that what I was expecting, but wan't exactly positive of my memory =)
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Mark,
    what we don't have enough time for is for the things that count. Replacing them with factoids makes life even tougher. You get to the core of better breathing by breathing in context not learning about semi controlled muscle spasms. That context like with Yoga or swimming is the most powerful lesson that a trumpet player can get. It may not be so handy for copy paste advice to the unknowing, but for the player that cares, they are changed for life.

    The thread is fine here. Breathing IS "General Trumpet".
     
  7. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    That's the way I do it!! As I said in the post, learning to exhale (as we remember Ms. Houston) is about relaxing. I believe relaxing IS the key to anything we do with the trumpet.
     
  8. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Breathing is easy. When we breathe in, we create lower air pressure in the lungs. Unless we are all tense, the air has no choice but to come rushing into our lungs.
     
  9. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    why don't you experiment and show yourself what it is to breathe????

    1.) just for starters go to the Athletic department at your college --- and have one of the football players tackle you (preferrably one of the stout ones -- at least big enough to "knock the air out of your lungs" -- BUT NOT OTHERWISE HURT YOU -- then you will discover what it "feels like" to breath again, and that will get you more in touch with breathing than any YOGA methods.

    2.) another thing -- just for starters is to go for a run -- NOT just around the block like some sissy college boy -- but try for a longer run in the duration of a few miles ----- and that will help you learn how to breath ---- to make it more real for you!!!!

    3.) go swimming in the college pool -- preferrably with some of the "women" lifeguards on duty ----- then go to the deep end, and hold your breath (yes, submerged so you don't cheat) as long as you can --- come up, and take a breath --then try that again. that will help you learn how to breath --------------and of course the worse(BEST) case scenario is that you "FAKE" a bit of drowning ---- JUST FOR A PRACTICE DRILL FOR THE PRETTY LIFEGUARDS --- and then recieve (mouth to mouth rescuscitation) ---- and whether or not that helps you breathe is NOT IMPORTANT --- as long as she takes your breath away. ROFL ROFL ROFL

    and that might help you determine what it is to breathe again!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
    patkins likes this.
  10. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Yeah, what a rush!
     

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