Hurry, hurry, hurry!!!

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by tobylou8, Jul 11, 2011.

  1. Conntribution

    Conntribution Fortissimo User

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    You and your flashy nickel plating.....appearance over substance eh??
     
  2. brian moon

    brian moon Forte User

    Nickel is substance, it isn't there as much for show as you might think.
     
  3. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    Yes it is a flow through design. That's it's "secret" to playing so well (mine that is and that Zig put mine together). ALL the valves are interchangeable so even trumpet players can't get it wrong upon cleaning and reassembly. 1st and 3rd slide are also ambidextrous!! I actually played mine in church yesterday. God obviously approves (I'm still alive to post!) and no one slapped me after service. ALL good signs! :thumbsup:
     
  4. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    I bet ya Southeastern could do a nice job with copper plating the bell and you would a have one of a kind!. The good thing is you can just take them the bell!!:lol:
     
  5. Conntribution

    Conntribution Fortissimo User

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    I have a Ranger. Somewhere buried amongst the horns.

    I've often thought of taking it to my plater nearby, having the nickel stripped, then giving it a Birchwood Casey bronze patina followed by a shot of satin urethane at my pal's body shop.
    Hey, if Dracula can do it?????
     
  6. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    This Pinto Post is gaining some legs ....

    TL, how do you know Zig put yours together? Did he sign it with one of those sword-like flashy Z's ??? The sign of Zig.:lol:

    Turtle
     
  7. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    Patina Green from Birchwood Casey might look cool if you leave the leadpipe original. With the black casing, you could pimp out your caps in some iridescent color (gold would be the obvious choice, so I would do something out of the ordinary). Post some pics when it's done!! ROFL
     
  8. Conntribution

    Conntribution Fortissimo User

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    Here's a thought....let's all not bid on it!!!! or send the hoople selling it a link to this thread!
     
  9. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    45 minutes and 18 replies!! ROFLROFLROFLROFLROFL
    (that's cuz secretly everyone wants a Pinto)

    There's a "Z" scratch mark on the horn (that's how I know!!):-P:-P
     
  10. Conntribution

    Conntribution Fortissimo User

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    Hey Mahatma! here's some neat stuff I just copied from Olds Central!


    One day they gave us a new design piston to make that had no 1,2 or 3. One piston would fit all three valves. It was interchangeable and was not stamped with a number. This would be the Pinto trumpet .Not only were the valves interchangeable but also the braces would unscrew and the bell and leadpipe would come off without unsoldering. In order to make the valves that way they had to change the position of the holes in the piston. This made a problem for us. The top and middle holes through the piston were too close together but they had to be that way to make the valves interchangeable. When balling out (expanding the tubing on the balling machine) there was a big hump in the bottom of the top crook. It looked awful but there was no way to get around it. You had to push so hard the piston would bend of the crook would split. We had to throw away up to half of the pistons we made for this horn. The one that was bent had to be junked however we could save some of the tubing splits by soldering them. We hated to make these pistons. They were the hardest to make. Also when we repaired them it was always on no bonus time .Any repair time was straight time .It was a big problem that they could never get around. So here is what they did.

    I picked up an Olds brochure at the music store about the Pinto and was surprised to see they had highlighted the large bump in the top crock. Why would they do that I wondered when they tried everything they could to get rid of it. They gave it a name. They called it “ turbotron “. The brochure said the horn played so well because the “turbotron” compressed the airflow then forced it out at increase speed and there fore improved the sound. It was a brilliant concept to take a problem and turn it into a plus. The Pintos did not do very well and we did not make many of them.

    The Olds Company purchased Reynolds and we were making the same horn and calling it two different names .We would have two boxes of valves and make one Olds and one Reynolds. For a while some had the idea that we would make all the small horns, both Olds and Conn, and Conn would make all the big horns Conn and Olds. We only made a few and then were told they had canceled that idea.
     

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