I am confused about bore sizes!

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Musochasle, Jan 4, 2012.

  1. Musochasle

    Musochasle New Friend

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    Dec 24, 2009
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    HELP!! - I have recently had abdominal surgery am finding my instrument (Getzen 300 cornet) quite hard blowing. Should I be trying large bore instruments or smaller ones? I tend to have too much breath which I think is causing my discomfort (I know - breath less!). Any suggestions on makes/models to look at would also be appreciated.

    Thanks.
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Bore size has little to do with how the horn blows. There are very stiff large bore horn/mouthpiece combinations and very open medium bore.

    When a cornet seems to back up, I would expect the problem to be your body use, embouchure and horn/mouthpiece. Your model 300 is a very decent instrument, not a Smith/Watkins or Sovereign but also not a killer when you have decent playing habits.

    Very often we can reduce the amount of "backpressure" by fixing our breathing. I teach a technique that I call Circle of Breath:

    Inhale until you are comfortably full, then EXHALE immediately. Picture this as a process represented by a circle. The left side is inhale and right exhale. Notice at the top and bottom of the circle there are no angles or bumps. Your breathing should behave the same way. Practice this a couple times until your breathing is smooth and "round". Then replace exhale with play (long tones). DO NOT USE THE TONGUE TO START THE NOTE!!!!!! Play at a natural, exhaled loudness. Do not PUSH the air out, let it flow. Generally this will be a solid mezzo forte. Do this for 10 to 15 minutes in your comfortable range. Then do a couple of lipslurs the same way - exhale, no tongue, little force. Once you have gotten the hang of exhaling notes, we add the tongue - but only enough to make the note start more cleanly. The articulation is merely a dot at the top of the circle - not a major change in geometry. DO NOT USE THE TONGUE TO CREATE HIGHER AIR PRESSURE TO GET YOUR SOUND GOING!!!!! Your air completely supports the sound and the tongue just articulates the airflow!

    Do this for a week to really get a feeling for exhaling instead of conquering the notes. Then start playing easy tunes, exhaled, lightly articulated floating on air. I think after this, you will have a different view of the response of your cornet.

    To be honest, I like a bit of resistance. It means that the horn is working for me and I don't need to push as hard.
     
  3. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    Very nice explanation.:D

    Totally agree with no tongue.

    I would modify it slightly to start the circle with an exhale to get rid of stale air and to help avoid tension.
     
  4. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Yes, Yes, Yes. My mistake!
     
  5. xjb0906

    xjb0906 Piano User

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    Bore size is less important than how the horn feels and plays for you. I learned my lesson When I was allowed to play Conn Connstellation at a Big Band rehearsal. The Conn is a .438 bore . My horn is a .470 bore. The Conn felt more open than mine. Try horns out to figure out what works best for you.
     
  6. Musochasle

    Musochasle New Friend

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    Many thanks for this - I'll give it a go. I am a returning player and hoping to do some brass band work - I am using a DW no.3 mouthpiece and also have a Benge 7C which is much brighter. Is the DW3 good for what I'm wanting to achieve or should I use the Benge 7C?

    One last question, I'd like to find out a bit more about my Getzen, it says its a 300 series, Elkhorn Wis. USA - serial no. is M9000 - is there a website on old Getzens?

    Many thanks for all the advice - VERY appreciated :play:
     
  7. nieuwguyski

    nieuwguyski Forte User

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    Sorry, I initially missed your reference to "old Getzens." I assume you've looked at the description of the current Getzen 300-series cornet:

    Getzen : Cornets : 381
     
  8. Musochasle

    Musochasle New Friend

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    I had looked but wasn't sure how much has changed. The 381 looks very similar, I see the 381 is a .460 bore which I guess is M/L ?

    Thanks for the pointer.
     
  9. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    The mouthpiece is secondary. The PLAYER needs to get their act together. I don't like C shaped mouthpiece cups on cornets BUT it seems that your first goal was more medical in nature. I buy mouthpieces based on sound, not numbers.
     
  10. Musochasle

    Musochasle New Friend

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    OK rowuk, and thanks - I prefer the DW3 tone anyway..... back to the exercises :-)
     

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