I got the range...now let's tackle the fingerings!

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by xelaris, Apr 14, 2009.

  1. xelaris

    xelaris New Friend

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    Jan 19, 2009
    Since I started playing trumpet, my main concern was about getting the range right - now I got it - that double C is comfortably enough and scratcing up to a sixth above it.
    The next step (fingerings) is probably easier...but is also open to different and diverging choices.
    It seems a paradox but having only 3 keys all of a sudden seems to be more of an issue than an advantage....maybe because my main instrument is the saxophone.
    I can play simple tunes by checking the fingering chart but that's very limiting...now is the time to find a proper way.

    Here are a few points I'm considering:
    -Going up the range is probably the safest bet as the overtones are all crammed close to one another so it's all about ear and mouth rather than fingerings - Am I right?
    -Someone mentioned about thinking in intervals rather than scales...how does this concept related to trumpet playing?
    -Are there any hidden patterns in the way certain notes/intervals are related in conjunction with fingerings?
    -Is it possible to play the normal range without using the 3rd valve?
     
  2. Sofus

    Sofus Forte User

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    Jul 26, 2008
    The natural tones can be played without any valves,
    and these tones are:


    PedalC (one octave below C on the ledger line below the staff)

    C on the ledger line below the staff
    G on the second line

    C on the third space
    E on the fourth space
    G above the staff

    HighC
    HighE
    HighG
    High Bb out of tune just below Double High C

    Double High C
    Double High D
    Double High E
    Double High F# out of tune
    ETC.

    If you want to play a note between any of the ones mentioned, you´ll
    have to press a valve. By doing that, you lower all the mentioned notes.

    Let´s say that you want to play a D on the fourth line. The natural note
    above the wanted D is the E on the fourth space, so you then play this E
    and press valve no. 1 which will lower the E one whole step down to the
    wanted D. If you instead want the D#, you press the second valve which
    only lowers all notes half a step, in this case from E down to D#.

    So the valves lower the natural notes like this:

    2nd valve -> all notes half a step down
    1st valve -> all notes a whole step down
    1st + 2nd valves simultaneously (or 3rd valve alone) -> 3 halfsteps down
    2nd + 3rd valves simultaneously -> all notes 2 whole steps down
    1st + 3rd valves simultaneously -> all notes 2 1/2 whole steps down
    All valves simultaneously -> all notes 3 whole steps down

    The names of all notes are often discussed, but we leave that for now.
    The explanation above is what I believe that you need at the moment,
    but as you go further, additional things about intonation etc. should be
    added . . .


    GOOD LUCK! :D
     
  3. gbdeamer

    gbdeamer Forte User

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    Oct 16, 2008
    Wow. A solid double C range after only a few months on the trumpet is amazing. Kudos to you. I have a friend who started life as a sax player and had a similar experience with fantastic range as soon as he picked up a trumpet, so maybe it's something to do with your sax embochure?

    As for the fingerings, yes there is a repeating pattern. Look on-line for a pdf copy of the Arban's book (or pick it up at a music store). You'll find information on fingerings, and the beginning lessons are arranged in a progression that will help you get the notes down.

    Since you're already an experienced musician I think it's just a matter of finding a "key" to switching your brain from the sax to the trumpet.

    Good luck.
     
  4. ltg_trumpet

    ltg_trumpet Mezzo Piano User

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    Jan 21, 2009
    yea nice job on the double c! ive been playinng for a good 5 years, and all ive got is an E... wish i had started on sax XD...
     
  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Strange, there were a lot of answers to this thread and now they seem to be gone.

    Double C is NOT the C above the staff, it is a whole octave more. I find an A above double C to be VERY unlikely - regardless of saxophone or not.

    In any case, the fingerings starting with G on top of the staff:

    G=0, Ab=23, A=12, Bb=1, B=2, C=0, C#=2 or 12, D=0 or 1, Eb=2, E=0, F=1, F#=2 and G=0. The next 2 octaves are fingered exactly the same way.
     
  6. xelaris

    xelaris New Friend

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    Jan 19, 2009
    All my answers in this thread are also gone!! What's going on?
    This forum is roasted as far as I know.
     
  7. willbarber

    willbarber Piano User

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    Medina, NY
    Yeah, it's been slow lately.

    Why was it down the other day?
     
  8. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Server change. There still seems to be some teething pains................
     
  9. willbarber

    willbarber Piano User

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    Medina, NY
    Yeah.

    Why'd we have to switch?
     
  10. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Don't know. The owner makes those decisions and he is the boss. Generally, servers are switched to improve performance, make more space available, offer new features, be more reliable, cost less............... There is often a period of time around migrations that are not quite as much fun. TM is free for us, so we take what we get. No place else that I would rather be!
     

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