I have a Horn Question I know this is a trumpet forum??No Laughing to my face!!

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by lovevixen555, Feb 2, 2009.

  1. lovevixen555

    lovevixen555 Banned

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    Ok all the girls I knew in school that played French Horn's had double French horns and they where easy to spot since they had a lot of tubeing. Now I see a lot of single French horns on th e used market and I have to ask what they used the single for??? Did I just go to a weird school that used Doubles only???? I never say a single French Horn until about a month ago when I started to look at used one's. I was afraid to ask the sales guy because I did not want to look stupid in public! I have no problem though looking stupid amongst my friends and peer's though!!!LOL I know that is back wards as can be but that is how I am! I know what I know but I sure as heek do not know everything!!! That is why I have friends!!!LOL Together we know just about everyting right guys and gals!!!LOL Thanks for any help I like to get smart ont hings before I do any more shopping around! I think I might like to try my hand at some Horn playng especialy for some Jazz action...DO not worry guys I am not crossing over tot he dark side or anything!!LOL:thumbsup:
     
  2. Solar Bell

    Solar Bell Moderator Staff Member

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    A single horn has one set of tubing, tuned in F, with three valves. A double horn has two sets of tubing, one in F and one in B-flat, with a thumb trigger that directs air to the B-flat side when pressed.
     
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    You can play everything on a single horn that can be played on a double, there is just more security in having the (high)Bb side too. It is like having a trumpet and picc built into one instrument. The F Horn has the same length of tubing as an F tuba and the Bb is like a baritone or trombone.

    The lighter, single horn is easier to learn on, a bit easier response, and more dangerous in the upper octave.

    Generally, you can spot an ex trumpet player on horn immediately: good upper register, splits high notes with pride though. Has a different embouchure than players that started with horn.
     
  4. Wlfgng

    Wlfgng Piano User

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    Now you're talking!
     
  5. lovevixen555

    lovevixen555 Banned

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    I figured it was probably something like that but I absolutely hate to assume things when I have choice!!! Thank's for the information... I have played a Mellophone that was ancient and came with two set's of slides but you had to switch them out they where not all built in. So I was hopeing that is all it was. I have always wanted to play a French Horn and play around with it for some jazz. I was just worried about shopping around for a used one with out first knowing the difference between the two! SO again thanks for the info!!! Bear in mind I will never be playing proffesionaly so I am not looking to break the bank!
     
  6. lovevixen555

    lovevixen555 Banned

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    Hey ROWUK how long until you talk Schilke into building just such a trumpet???? Taylor will build anything if you have the money!!! I am suprised no one has approached them about a "double trumpet"!
     
  7. Nerf

    Nerf Piano User

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    Hey...I resemble that remark!! :cool:
     
  8. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I have played some prototype double trumpets (Armondo Ghitalla had the first one that I ever tried, I think it was D/Eb and C). Not with my money. All the trumpet parts that I am familiar with work just fine with "normal" instruments. I am not an advocate of playing big trumpet stuff on little horns. That goes for Bolero, Mahler 8, Pictures, Symphonic Dances from West Side Story and a ton of other things that players more worried about security than color "cheat" on! For many things I prefer the Bb sound over the C too.

    Schilke has had some 4 valved horns in their history, that is not too bad of a comprimise.
     
  9. lovevixen555

    lovevixen555 Banned

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    I think most of us think they got it right when they decided to do Bb and low pitch!! It is the work horse of the industry for sure even if some people do like secuirty!!!LOL I never had a "C" trumpet of my own but borried one on a couple occassions since it did make life easier to just play the music as I read it!!! Guess what I borrowed??? A Bach Strad in "C"!!!LOL I think this is why Ihate Bach's so much to this day.....I swear I think their was a Duck stuck some place inthat horn and about 50% of the "C" strad's I have heard since have also been a bit to duck like on some notes!!!LOL My Merceds never sounded like a Duck and I do wish I had it still. I regret selling 13 or so year's ago when I thought I would never play again.

    You know I a not bigon 4 valve instruments. Sure I have played some baritones and tuba's that had 4 valves but I did fine with 3 valve models so they never really did nuch for me. Since I have not bought one for myself yet I do not know what I will get but it will more then likely just have 3 valves since that is all I need for what I would be doing. I have seen some non-picolo 4 valve trumpets on ebay and I just do not see the big deal about it!!! Like wise two vale field horns donothing for me! I am sure they do what they are meant to do but I make due just fine with a 3 valve Bb standard size trumpet. I would like a Piccolo though and a bass trumpet.
     
  10. Ursa

    Ursa Piano User

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    Hey, lovevixen555...if you're considering taking up the Horn as a doubling instrument for jazz, you might want to consider a single B-flat horn instead of an F. Holton has made single B-flat horns for ages; they have resonant, lyrical sound, respond easily, and you can read off trumpet charts. Plus, when improvising, your won't be confused by the horn's C's sounding like your trumpet's G's as would be the case with an F horn. Just my two cents' worth.
     

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