I have asthma should i still play the trumpet?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by longmvu, Nov 25, 2011.

  1. longmvu

    longmvu New Friend

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    I have asthma should i still play the trumpet?
     
  2. xjb0906

    xjb0906 Piano User

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    Yes. We had one tube player in my high school band during my junior year. He played louder and with a better sound than some bands' tuba sections of 5 and 6 players. After one show he did have an episode that required the use of his inhaler followed by him losing his lunch. He survived and went on to make 1st chair in the Allstate band. If he could play tuba with asthma then you can play trumpet.
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2011
  3. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Look at the trumpet as asthma therapy. There is a measure known as FEV1 25-75 which is a measure of peripheral airway availability. This is where the greatest quantity of gas exchange (air) takes place. This is kept open by Positive End Expiratory Pressure (PEEP). We apply pressure techniques in medicine in people with obstructive lung disease (asthma is included in this category) to optimize this FEV1 25-75 value. A (relatively) cheep and easy piece of equipment that can do this is called the trumpet. Should you still play trumpet if you have asthma. The answer: Only if you want to enhance your lung function.

    Hope this answer is of help.
     
  4. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    I would think so, and since the doctor is in, I would follow his advice! :-)
     
  5. krmanning

    krmanning Pianissimo User

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    I have asthma and I played all the way through high school, college, and medical school; took a 19 year hiatus; and have been playing again for 6 years. Except on really bad days, the asthma doesn't seem to give me any problems.
     
  6. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    This question has come up before in TM. Of course you can play the trumpet with asthma. You may need to be a little more aware of certain things, as krmanning noted. But that's okay.

    The truth is that many of us have limitations that we have to compensate for. I had my tonsils and adenoids removed in the 5th grade, and have had to deal with velopharyngeal insufficiency ever since (air sometimes leaking through my nose). To this day (30+ years later), it's still something I have to work on. But it didn't prevent me from playing the trumpet or playing 1st chair in high school and college.

    Oh and Gary, gotcha in a typo. As you know, it's "FEF 25-75%" or "FEV1". There is no "FEV1 25-75%". Better get back to work on your MKSAP. ;-)

    Mike
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2011
  7. AKtrumpet

    AKtrumpet Piano User

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    Arnold Jacobs, tubist of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra for 44 years, had asthma and health problems as a child and adult. He was also considered an expert on breathing as it relates to brass.

    If someone can play tuba at a professional level with asthma then certainly someone can play trumpet at a professional level with asthma.

    Treat it as a challenge not a hindrance.
     
  8. rafaelsatchmo

    rafaelsatchmo New Friend

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    Hey, the great Rafael Mendez suffered from asthma in the later half of his illustrious career. And nobody ever knew. Playing the horn should be great therapy! (Both physical & emotional.)
     
  9. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Rule 1: Keep brain in gear while the fingers go a typing. TrumpetMD is 100% correct: The mid-flow rate or forced expiratory flow (FEF) occures in the middle 50% of the patient's exhaled volume (FEF25-75%). The physiological explanation was correct, but the appreviation as TrumpetMD noted did not reflect the actual measure which is a flow rate (not volume). That's OK Mike, my recert in internal medicine is not until 2013, so I have another year to dot the i's and cross the t's on the MKSAP review. I am actually starting the MOP component this month as I begin preparing for my pediatric recert in 2012. Thank goodness the American Board of Internal Medicine accepts two steps of the 4 Pediatric MOP!
     
  10. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    Yes. I knew you had it right, but just got the letters mixed up. But I couldn't resist. I'm not up until 2018.

    Mike
     

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