I need tips, my tone is slipping away....

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Rainiac, Mar 14, 2010.

  1. Rainiac

    Rainiac New Friend

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    Earth. For sure.
    I had some surgery on my shoulders about a month ago, so my practice time was limited, plus, I was lazy. Can't deny that :p But I'm feeling the consequences now, since my tone is really crappy and my range is limited from low "g" to "a" just above the staff, and that "a" sounds "a"wful. I'm feeling quite discouraged every time I play, and I need some tips on how to regain what I've lost here, because I have a solo soon in Seattle, and I'm very nervous in the first place. I'm in grade 11, by the way, no professional here. Do I just need to practice my "a"ss off? Allsssso I don't know if this SHOULD make a difference, but I play the bass clarinet also, and it feels like I'm worse on my trumpet after I've been practicing my bass....any thoughts on that Trumpetmasters? Thanks!
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    You just need to intelligently practice as much as you can. There is no shortcut. Clarinet will not hurt if you are getting enough time in. If you are still lazy, you should rethink the solo.
     
  3. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    My experience in combining a reed instrument and a brass instrument was a bad one.
    I've played trumpet since 4th grade and when in 11th grade, my dad bought me a tenor sax. Well, I practiced the sax and what I found was that the time I used on the sax took away from the trumpet. My tone, range and just about all other aspects of the trumpet went into the toilet. What I discovered was just ONE instrument is hard enough.
    I quickly dumped the sax and the trumpet playing went back to where it was before the sax. Also, the embrochure for a sax is alot different than the embrochure used on the trumpet. That's a lot of work to master both. If you've got the time, cool. If not (which 99% of us don't) dump one of them.
     
  4. trumpetnick

    trumpetnick Fortissimo User

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    It didn't hurt Maynard, Robert Rotter (Mnozil Brass) seem to do just fine as well...Myself I never tried to really play a reed instrument though.
     
  5. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    I suspect Maynard was a lot like Roy Clark, they both can play just about anything.
    However, I don't remember ever seeing MF play a reed instrument. I've seen him play a lot of different brass but never a reed instrument. Can you head me toward a clip that shows MF playing sax?
    Thanks
     
  6. trumpetnick

    trumpetnick Fortissimo User

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  7. trumpetnick

    trumpetnick Fortissimo User

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    Look around 4'00" Probably not the most refined soprano sax solo that I have ever heard, but still...
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2010
  8. Harry Richardson

    Harry Richardson New Friend

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    Jan 17, 2010
    Clarinet players usually play with a raised tongue and play with a much more closed/cold air setup. That's why most clarinet players don't usually do well with trumpet in brass class in college. It's a totally different "blow". That will definitely adversely impact your trumpet tone quality.
     
  9. Al Innella

    Al Innella Forte User

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    Soft long tones ,lip flexibilities , and scales, playing soft will help strengthen your embouchure muscles and keep your lips from spreading which will help tone and range.
     
  10. rbdeli

    rbdeli Mezzo Piano User

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    Rowuk is right. There are no shortcuts to a good full tone and sound on the trumpet. What you need to do is spend most of your time playing in the lower register and making it sound as big, open easy-flowing and beautiful as you can. This is how you bring back your sound and range. Practice low, then as you feel ready to increase your range, work to make all the notes sound as easy, open and effortless as the low ones. Don't stretch your lips to make a higher note. Keep your lips together and say , "who". Stretching the lips apart makes them less elastic, cuts off the vibration and worsens your tone. Don't look at this as a set back, but an opportunity to become a more fluid, easy player.
     

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