I was Born in the wrong time!

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by eisprl, Apr 7, 2007.

  1. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
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    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    Eric,
    Maybe you will define trumpet playing one day as they did for a previous generation. We didn't need you as much back then, because we had them. Go for it!
     
  2. Tom Mac

    Tom Mac Pianissimo User

    184
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    Mar 11, 2007
    Nashville Tennessee
    I was born in 3/4 time how 'bout you.

    T Mac

    Life is a waltz
     
  3. ptynan

    ptynan Pianissimo User

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    Sep 13, 2005
    Antigonish, NS

    Hahahaha......11/8 for me......
     
  4. Gary Schutza

    Gary Schutza Pianissimo User

    50
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    Apr 6, 2007
    Kansas City
    I'm going to tell you about a shameful thing in my younger years.
    When I was a very young player you could occasionally see Louis Armstrong on TV, and a bit later I'd notice a much older Dizzy playing. This was at the tail end of their lives and they weren't at the top of their games.
    I was young and cocky and my friends and I sort of made fun of these (and other) giants. All I heard was Louis struggling with what I thought were pretty simple things. Or maybe I heard Dizzy having trouble with some high note. Shameful, Shameful!!!!
    A few years ago I decided to get some earlier recordings of these men in their prime. I was overwhelmed! To my amazement these guys could REALLY play. I mean REALLY PLAY. And not just better than when they were older, I mean as well or better than anyone has every played. This was life changing for me. I was horrified that I had ever thought so little of these magnificent giants of the last century, and I admit this now to my total shame. I always appreciated Al Hirt and Doc Severinson. But I have an overwhelming respect for Harry James, Dizzy, Armstrong and to a lesser extent, Miles (still working on that one). To hear them in their prime they were doing things that had never been done before, they had no real examples to emulate.

    I hope if we ever meat in Heaven they will forgive my stupidity.

    To any younger players: Buy/listen to all the greats, and learn what they have to teach. Harry James, Severinsen, Al Hirt, Mendez, Armstrong, Gillespie, Miles, Chase, Brisboise, Andre, Hardenberger, Wynton, Herseth, Kaderabek (my teacher), Harry Glantz (his teacher), Armando Ghitalla, Charlie Schlueter, Arturo Sandoval and so many that I can't even think of. I'm sorry if I've left out your particular favorite. I have learned so much from each of them.
     
  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
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    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    Gary,
    I am sure that you have been forgiven by all of the above mentioned!

    Maybe your issue with Miles has nothing to do with his playing. He was infinitely creative and had an infinitely difficult personality. I can recognise his genius, even although I see nothing that I play that would presently benefit from further study. He will still be there if my situation changes!

    To your list of greats I would add a number of non brass players. I find great inspiration in an oboe players ability to phrase, the resonance of a cello, the sweetness of a well played violin and the vicious attack of a harpsichord tone (the string is struck with a quill and I can't think of anything with a more precise attack!).

    Bravo!
     
  6. Gary Schutza

    Gary Schutza Pianissimo User

    50
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    Apr 6, 2007
    Kansas City
    thanks rowuk,
    another thought from me. (Oh no—not anymore!!)
    I've been playing trumpet in orchestras since 1980 or so. Seems like every week we have yet another wunderkind violin virtuoso, each one with more technique that the last. But after all of these years I hardly remember them. What I do remember is the soloists who moved me almost to tears onstage. Three in particular whom I cannot recall their names but I remember the pieces they played. One was the Barber Violin Concerto 2nd mvt., another was the Korngold Violin Concerto 2nd mvt, and the third was a pianist playing the Ravel Left Hand Concerto. The music in these soloists has stayed with me for many years. I can't even remember the soloist this past week, but I remember that Korngold concerto. The musicality and expressiveness haunt me. Incredible technique gets old and boring. Musicality never does.

    chip schutza
     
  7. A.N.A. Mendez

    A.N.A. Mendez Utimate User

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    Oct 25, 2005
    Sunny Ca.
    Darn! For a minute there I thought someone was going to explain Miles to me.......Oh well......
     
  8. trpt2345

    trpt2345 Mezzo Forte User

    858
    4
    May 21, 2006
    Morelia, Mexico
    Start with Kind of Blue. Then work both forwards (Blackhawk, Miles Smiles, Nefertiti, In a Silent Way, Bitches Brew, Jack Johnson) and backwards (Milestones, 'Round Midnight, Cookin', Workin', Bag's Groove, Dig, Paris 1949).
    Pace Rowuk, the thing isn't about the bravura things he plays so much (although there are things that'll scare you-try playing the Tune Up solo from 1955 or the Orbits solo from 1966) as it is the beautiful things that he thinks of. Of course, many trumpet players could play what Miles played. But NOBODY ELSE THOUGHT OF THEM!

    Michael McLaughlin

    Lawyers know life practically. A bookish man should always have them to converse with.
    Samuel Johnson
     

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