If George Carlin played the trumpet...

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Satchmo Brecker, Aug 25, 2011.

  1. Satchmo Brecker

    Satchmo Brecker Piano User

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    Seriously, can someone settle some terminology once and for all. There's "lip trills" (LT), "lip slurs" (LS), "shakes" (SH) and just now when searching TM I found "toungue trills" (TT). I think SH are just a cool performance trick whereas the others refer to foundational things we practice. I *think*. So I have this great sheet titled "Lip Trills", that really are a bunch of exercises in the usual C B Bb...F# fingerings where you work the intervals. So that to me is a lip trill...except that the thing that moves is my tongue, not my lips (or at least I've been told that's a good practice). And when I watch great players I rarely see their lips move, which tells me it's all or mostly in the tongue. Can someone clear things up. I feel like I'm at a George Carlin show. ("Why are driveways the place we park, and parkways the place we drive?")
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2011
  2. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    I've posted this stuff before, and don't feel guilty for reposting:

    Time for one of the more esoteric Vulgano Brother observations, the (MB) approach. When we play a note, the air column inside the instrument has defined and mathematically predictable areas of high pressure and no pressure. In physics these are known as nodes and anti-nodes. The higher the tone, the more of these nodes inside the instrument. With a horn of sufficient light weight, we can play a long tone we can gently run a finger around the leadpipe and/or bell and feel some of the vibrations. Change to a different harmonic and that place will move.

    Now for the esoteric part. Playing a long tone, we can shift our awareness to inside the trumpet, and imagine/feel a point of resistance somewhere inside the horn. I call these "magic bubbles." To slur up, we can "blow" this magic bubble further away, backing off will allow the magic bubble to return to its place closer to the mouthpiece.

    Our body will memorize the feel of these notes and nodes much more quickly than the cognitive control of several variables can, because the lips and tongue move automatically. Remember that the embouchure is (or should be, in the Zen Vulgano philosophy)formed in part by the note that it is playing.

    Experiment a bit, and have fun!
     
  3. veery715

    veery715 Utimate User

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    Swami Vulgano has written! Take a breath, release, and: Ommmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm.....:worthy:
     
  4. gbdeamer

    gbdeamer Forte User

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    IMO, lip trills and tongue trills are the same thing - fast lip slurs. I can't provide a better explanation that VB so I won't even try.

    A shake is a different thing and not just a "cool performance trick" as you put it. You'll find them called for in in TONS of jazz and big band pieces where composers/arrangers are looking for a specific sound...the shake. If you don't practice them you won't be able to do them when called for.

    To do a shake simply shake the horn with your right hand while following VB's guidance.
     
  5. gbdeamer

    gbdeamer Forte User

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  6. Satchmo Brecker

    Satchmo Brecker Piano User

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    I've seen VB's post before, very nice, and gotta agree, the trumpet is a zen thing if ever there was one! And I didn't mean to denigrate "shakes" by calling them a trick. I know exactly what they are and where they're used. IMHO they're one of those things that make big band jazz big band jazz. Not many posts yet but is there a consensus that LT, LS, and TT's all refer to the same thing? And am I right in comparing the terminology ala Carlin? They all seem to be primarily done using the tongue, and yet we call them "lip ____".
     
  7. jiarby

    jiarby Fortissimo User

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    It `taint whaychya do .... it's how thatchya do it
     
  8. richtom

    richtom Forte User

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    I believe that if George Carlin played the trumpet, he would not visit trumpet websites very often. He'd have little use for the volumes of BS that passes as information. He would certainly know fact from "fiction", though.
    Rich T.
     
  9. Peter McNeill

    Peter McNeill Utimate User

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    I always thought a "Shake" was simply using your arm to vibrate the note like a wide vibrato, and I used it where it said shake. You use the "Ah-ee" with the wrist to move the horn and easily get the shake affect.

    Recently, I came across a piece of music with a notation "Wide Shake" - and I had this explained to me by the First Trumpet, It is a wide lip trill - not using the arm to shake at all. So this is where the lip slur and lip trill exercises come to the fore. He then demonstrated the Wide Shake - sounded a lot better than just shaking the horn.

    The wide shake was not just between 2 partials using "Ah-ee", but picking 2 partials wide apart and lip sluring between the 2 - and fast. A Lot of practice for this to happen. Up higher the partials are closer and easier to get the lip trill going, but a Wide Shake uses 2 partials that are separated by other partials. This is serious Shed time to do well. I have heard it, and seen it, but not able to do it - yet.
     
  10. Peter McNeill

    Peter McNeill Utimate User

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