Im in a pickle

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Gxman, Feb 8, 2010.

  1. Gxman

    Gxman Piano User

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    Jan 21, 2010
    Hi

    Where I live there is no trumpet teachers near by. Im also 'short' on affording the lessons but I am also very impatient by nature and when I wanna start I wanna start NOW, because I want to be good sooner than later.

    Any tips on what I can do from behind this screen?

    I know I can get a sound out of the trumpet but I dont want to be learning incorect embrochure either... and I cant find anything with up close explanation of what you are meant to do with your mouth.

    Are you ment to pull your lips in sort of like saxophone without bending bottom lip in?

    Are you meant to like 'smile' which pulls the lips appart and brings them closer to teeth

    Do you just have lips exactly how they are when your not talking and then just vibrate them in that identical position.... (thats how I can make sound)

    etc...

    Kinda need some direction/lesson on here if possible.

    I know theres a 'for students' thread offering mouthpieces etc... this isnt exactly whats in there but its still something 'for student'.... is it close enough to be helped? :huh:
     
  2. trumpmac

    trumpmac Pianissimo User

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    Aug 8, 2009
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    There a lot of great teachers on this site that give online lessons I'd look into that :thumbsup:
     
  3. ComeBackKid

    ComeBackKid Fortissimo User

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    May 11, 2009
    Yorba Linda, CA
    Hello, Gxman. The issue of how to structure an embouchure has been debated since the second guy started playing trumpet (the first guy had nobody to debate with). When I learned back more than 50 years ago, the smile embouchure (sides pulled back with lips stretched over the teeth) was the standard. When I started my comeback and joined this forum, I quickly found out that the 'pucker' method is now considered the preferred setup. There are a lot of threads here and if you do a search with 'pucker' (search only works with one word), you can find a lot of reading to do.

    But, to get you started, the way that seems to be the easiest is to either pretend that you are blowing on your hot soup (I prefer to say that you are trying to spit out a watermelon seed) or form your mouth like you are going to say the letter 'M' (with a slight opening between the lips). Then just start blowing air out of the opening and put the mouthpiece to your lips until you start to hear a tone (you may need to blow fairly hard at first). There is no need to make your lips buzz prior to placing the mouthpiece on them.

    So, do the search, read some threads and see if this works. I have switched from the smile method so I can be more politically correct here and it seems to work quite well.

    Good luck.
     
  4. Gxman

    Gxman Piano User

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    Jan 21, 2010
    Hi thanks for that.

    The spitting watermellon seed out method (lol)... is probbably the way I got the sound. I got thick lips so yeah... trying to 'tighten' them back kind makes the sides of jaw/cheeks uncomfortable (gets sore if held too long - like smiling all day - gets sore)

    Have I got the 2 ways correct?

    Any picture or video anyone can upload upclose so I can have a good look at it?

    Who are the trumpet teachers on here?

    Btw - Its G-man, didnt let me put it in that way so I stuck an X to break the 2 up.

    George
     
  5. stumac

    stumac Fortissimo User

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    Oct 19, 2008
    Flinders Vic Australia
    George,

    Get yourself a copy of "The only No Mystery guide to Trumpet Mastery" by Greg Spence, www.mysterytomastery.com. has a cd with all the lessons on it and detailed explanation.

    Read several times and follow stepwise, this is the best book I have found for beginners and comeback players.

    Regards, Stuart.
     
  6. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    Jan 4, 2009
    Clarksburg, WV
    Search 215th Army Band trumpet lessons. You'll find 10 of them.
     
  7. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    Oct 22, 2008
    Maryland
    A lot of helpful tips have been presented.

    But if you really are just starting out, wouldn't it be best to start with a teacher, to make sure you get started correctly?

    PM some of the TM members who live in your state. Maybe they can suggest a teacher near you.

    My teacher charges $25 a half hour. If cost really is an issue, maybe you could figure out ways to be creative? You could study twice a month, instead of every week. Or, you could take lessons for only for a few months, to make sure you get started correctly. No sure of your age, but assuming you're still living at home, maybe a part-time job or a creative arrangement with your parents could help pay for lessons?

    You said you're "impatient". Nothing wrong with that. But just think of how much more impatient you will be if you have to un-learn several bad habits you may have created trying to figure things out on your own.
     
  8. Solar Bell

    Solar Bell Moderator Staff Member

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    May 11, 2005
    Metro Detroit
    What is your genaral location G man?
     
  9. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
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    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    DON'T DO IT. GET A LESSON FROM A DECENT PLAYER. MESSING UP THE BEGINNING MAKES IT REALLY TOUGH TO GET ON THE RIGHT TRACK LATER.

    You don't need the final teacher to get started. Any good player can show you how it works and give you tips as you develop. I am not big on starting DIY with trumpet. I have had to repair too many sins from frustrated students. Some never make it.............
     
  10. etrumpetlessons

    etrumpetlessons New Friend

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    Nov 16, 2009
    Colorado
    Shameless plug: While recognizing the limitations of learning how to play the trumpet without a teacher, I've put together a video trumpet lesson series for folks in your exact situation. Link is in my signature below.
    I agree with other sentiments posted here. Whatever you can do to get it right at the beginning is perhaps the best investment you'll make over your whole trumpet playing career.
     

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