Importance of Fundamental Skills

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by SteveMinion, Jun 22, 2013.

  1. SteveMinion

    SteveMinion New Friend

    4
    1
    Apr 3, 2013
    Hello everyone,

    I am curious to see what skills others view as the most important aspects in trumpet playing. Below I have listed several fundamental skills needed to play the trumpet.

    In no particular order:
    -Technique
    -Endurance
    -Range
    -Tone Quality
    -Flexibility
    -Articulation
    -Intonation

    I would appreciate it if you guys could rank the importance of these skills and explain why. I have my own personal ranking that I would love to share after seeing some of the responses.

    ~SM
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2013
  2. VetPsychWars

    VetPsychWars Fortissimo User

    3,751
    2,152
    Nov 8, 2006
    Greenfield WI
    Playing in tune. Hearing the chord and playing with the correct intonation for that chord. If you can't do that, you might as well not play.

    Tom
     
  3. SteveMinion

    SteveMinion New Friend

    4
    1
    Apr 3, 2013
    I agree playing in tune is an important skill. I will add it to the list above. I am interested to see how you would rank the skills in order of importance
     
  4. Rapier

    Rapier Forte User

    2,005
    1,311
    Jul 18, 2011
    UK
    Tone Quality
    Technique
    Articulation
    Flexibility
    Range
    Endurance
     
  5. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

    8,215
    7,607
    Jul 20, 2006
    Heart of Dixie
    They're all important, but here are my rankings, from most important down.

    Intonation
    Tone Quality
    Articulation
    Technique
    Flexibility
    Endurance
    Range

    If you're not in tune, nothing else matters. Good tone is second, as no one wants to listen to someone with a crappy sound. Articulation is next, followed closely by technique, which enhances your presentation and what you can do with a good sound. The last three build on the solid foundation of the first four, and allow you to do more with the skills you already have.
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2013
  6. Cornyandy

    Cornyandy Fortissimo User

    3,139
    1,603
    Jan 9, 2010
    East Yorkshire
    I'm not sure I would like to think in those terms they are all parts of the whole (although I would add breath control to your list)

    Put it this way, without technique there is no range, Range is relative to your tone quality when you get up there.

    Technique,
    Breathing,
    Articulation,
    Tone quality
    Intonation
    Endurance and Range I would put together because one can affect the other.
    Flexibilty

    I really don't see the benefit of working this in one order or another simply because I think there should be a more holistic approach but that's my best shot
     
  7. VetPsychWars

    VetPsychWars Fortissimo User

    3,751
    2,152
    Nov 8, 2006
    Greenfield WI
    Well, this is my own experience...

    Intonation
    Endurance
    Range
    Articulation
    Flexibility
    Tone Quality

    I put tone quality last because people seem to obsess about that the most and who cares? A trumpet sounds like a trumpet, right?

    Tom
     
  8. BustedChops

    BustedChops Mezzo Forte User

    959
    216
    Oct 1, 2011
    I think tone quality trumps em all. Most people will perceive your playing to be good if your tone is good.
     
  9. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

    8,215
    7,607
    Jul 20, 2006
    Heart of Dixie
    When I think of tone quality, I think of trumpet players I've heard that had a pinched, nasal tone, others who've had a blatty tone, and others who were just obnoxious. I think it's pretty important to have a good tone if you want people to enjoy listening to you.
     
  10. Comeback

    Comeback Forte User

    1,859
    1,044
    Jun 22, 2011
    Fort Wayne, IN
    I am going to suggest that the number one skill is listening. This is an active conscious endeavor, the quality of which degrades as we become fatigued. We must listen attentively to other artists as we develop our own sound. We must listen closely to ourselves as we solo. We must listen to our section mates and group as we perform with others to be sure we are doing our part well. Perhaps most importantly, we must resist the temptation to become mechanical and concentrate and listen as we practice so we know we are indeed improving. I am really not sure the other named skills matter so much without this one.
    Jim
     

Share This Page