Improving articulations in the extremes of one's range

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Mark_Kindy, Apr 20, 2012.

  1. Mark_Kindy

    Mark_Kindy Mezzo Forte User

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    Been having some problems with "pops" or somtimes "fluffy" articulations in the lower range, and some cracky articulation in the upper range. Any suggestions to improve this, beyond practicing?

    Thank you,
    Mark
     
  2. DaTrump

    DaTrump Forte User

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    Lighter tonguing with more tip in it
     
  3. Local 357

    Local 357 Banned

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    Lip flesh/mass stays soft and pliable throughout whole register of the instrument. pedals to Quadruple C.

    Should help articulation in general.

    Lower register requires (or usually requires depending upon how naturally gifted a player is) firm mouth corners. So does the upper register.

    The softness of the flesh in cup and firmness of muscles on and outside the inner rim of the mouthpiece I call the "Tension/Suppleness Threshold Factor" or T/STF.

    ALL problems of performance and musicality related to the blowing of the trumpet (not associated with air support or bad musicianship) are linked to how well one maintains the T/STF. Whether they know it or not.

    The gifted types merely unconsciously maintain an effective T/STF ratio. They blow and everything sounds great with little personal understanding of what the hell they are doing. Consequently they make the WORST teachers although most are fairly bad anyway.
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2012
  4. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    keep the lips flexible and the air support/breath support/fast air -- whatever you call your air -----keep it!!! a touch MORE air in the notes below the staff --- and DONT THINK ABOUT THE LOW REGISTER being difficult ---- supple lips and good air support with plenty of air --- make nice sounding notes down to the low F#. the high register --- supposed to be the same thing -- supple and flexible lips, light touches on the tongue -- and DONT OVER THINK THE PROCESS!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    oh people are going to hate that advice!!!!!!!!!! ROFL ROFL ROFL
     
  5. richtom

    richtom Forte User

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    "Say "tu" with the tongue for fast and nice sounding tonguing. This keeps it out of the way, or it will hinder the sound. It also keeps multiple tonguing faster and more even".
    Advice from Bud Herseth via OJ Utnes' website.
    Of course, what does Bud know about playing the trumpet?
    Try this. It does work. Also, try saying 'tay" in the low register. That syllable keeps the tongue down and prevents a tubby sound. That is another Herseth suggestion, but again, what does HE know?
    RT
     
    codyb226 likes this.
  6. vern

    vern Piano User

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    My teacher told me the mid-upper range gets brachy because the embouchure is not firm enough. Firming up reduced, if not eliminated, my problem.
     
  7. ultratrumpet

    ultratrumpet Piano User

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    beyond practicing, NO ...
    YES, learn K-Tongue Modified
     
  8. ultratrumpet

    ultratrumpet Piano User

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    CHOOSE A SOUND TO EMULATE

    What I do in my daily practice is first listen to a player that I admire. Bill Vacchiano as a child, listened to a recording of Harry Glantz every morning before starting practice- " just to get the sound in my ear ."
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2012
  9. Mark_Kindy

    Mark_Kindy Mezzo Forte User

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    Thank you all!

    Listening sounds good, always.

    I've found having the tongue more forward has helped my double tonguing clarity, especially in the lower register. Also using the tip, and air (yes, KT). I almost feel like I'm tonguing too hard sometimes, and sometimes not hard enough, though...hmm.
    I'll look into syllables, RT.

    Local -- I know what you mean about the mouth corners, for sure. After a long piece of low, quick tonguing, I find that my corners are feeling it. Lips feel very warmed up after it though (opens up the sound), thought that was interesting.
    Perhaps I'm not keeping it firm enough, however... could be. We are defining the mouth corners as inside the mouthpiece, or the ends of the lips, which is outside? There always seems to be some confusion.

    On a related note, I tend to have a slight bit of air escape when I tongue. In a lesson, we attempted to address this by having me "tighten my lips", an endeavor which was not successful, whether due to the approach or to my ability, I'm not sure.
    Perhaps this may also shed some light on the issue.
     
  10. Local 357

    Local 357 Banned

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    The last complaint:

    Air escaping from side of lips is of ZERO concern. Same as the light leakage coming out of every air compressor used in construction. So long as sufficient pressure is available to drive the nail? all is fine. Exact same concept with blowing the horn.

    It really makes me BURN when I hear of instructors trying to eliminate this "fault" in students. Again: Every instructor of chops has a 19th century approach. Except for assigning you exercises and advice on literature/musicality etc? His advice is probably useless. As is much of the advice on this forum. Except for my own which I offer freely.

    The others charge (or are trying to charge for it) and probably can't help anyone all that much.
     

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