Improving low register tonal quality and agility

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by shadowcaster, Sep 28, 2012.

  1. shadowcaster

    shadowcaster New Friend

    10
    1
    Dec 20, 2011
    Hello,


    I understand that the question I'd like to ask may be considered slightly odd by some, but hope it will meet understanding.


    I am trying to improve my low range. Not in order to improve my high range, but because I like the low range, and it is not that much covered in the literature. The principle of extending the midrange embouchure downwards is clear to me and practically works rather well for me down to pedal E, occasionally to pedal D on Bb trumpet. I'm satisfied with the range.


    However, I'd like to improve the agility, and beauty of tone, in order to get a more subtle, breathy tonal quality, like Tom Harrell and Jon Hassell often use in their music. I know this is not very "breath-efficient", yet the beauty of tone they get justifies it IMHO. Most of the time I play for the microphone, so loudness is not an issue to me.

    Are there any recommended exercise for this?


    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. mctrumpet98

    mctrumpet98 Pianissimo User

    242
    89
    Sep 29, 2011
    Down Under
    Tone - long tones.

    Agility - lip flexibilities in the lower register.

    It's as simple as that.
     
  3. GijsVis

    GijsVis Piano User

    436
    105
    Jul 23, 2012
    Long tones, lip flexibilities in the lower register, use lots and lots and lots of air, the lower you go, the more are needed, and play with an open and relaxed embouchure.

    The first tier of pedals (the pedal F to the pedal C#) are the hardest one of all, and the Pedal C is also a nasty one, you might want to start on the second tier, which is Pedal B to Pedal F#, they are actual parts of the harmonics, rather than the first tier, which are no real notes, just lipped down notes, the second tier will play like normal notes, if you really relax your embouchure and blow very airy (I said that already right? ;)).

    You can get really low, like bass trombone or tuba range, Double or even Triple Pedal tones are possible, it varies how low I can get, but with a normallish tone, my lowest is Pedal F#, and my lowest played note is about Double Pedal E, I have some information about it on some of my threads, just search my page, or I'll post something tomorrow, since it's midnight out here.

    What also might help is using a harmon mute or a flugel, for a better low register tone quality and more support.
    There's also a video on youtube about pedal tones, in which they cover all pedals, just search for trumpet pedal tones, I believe they guy is call brassinstructor or something.

    Did I mention: Use lots of relaxed air?
     
  4. shadowcaster

    shadowcaster New Friend

    10
    1
    Dec 20, 2011
    Thanks for taking time to read and reply. This sounds encouraging, since it is what I supposed it should be. I understand the register I'm interested in musically improving is not really the one which is indispensable for making one's daily bread by playing the horn. It's often neglected and referred to as "mud"...
    (-:
    I agree, the first tier of pedals are no real harmonics indeed, yet my instrument really helps me making them musically useful.
    I also often used the no-stem harmon when I felt like needing more support in practicing the lows.
     
  5. BrianCade

    BrianCade New Friend

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    5
    Jun 30, 2012
    Try the Sabarich exercise.
     
  6. GijsVis

    GijsVis Piano User

    436
    105
    Jul 23, 2012
    Double Pedal sound really mellow and sweet with a harmon, rather than a bubbly fart sound :lol:
     
  7. shadowcaster

    shadowcaster New Friend

    10
    1
    Dec 20, 2011
    Thanks. What was the exact title? Did you mean "Dix √Čtudes : concertantes et d'interpr√©tation pour trompettes, par Raymond Sabarich", published by Selmer, Paris, 1954 - 1968? Seems to be out of print. I'll check with the libraries of some music departments I collaborate with.
     
  8. BrianCade

    BrianCade New Friend

    18
    5
    Jun 30, 2012
    No, I mean the Sabarich exercise. Start on Double pedal C, slur to low C then C in the staff. Play softly. Repeat on double pedal B. double pedal B-flat, pedal A, pedal A-flat, pedal G and pedal f-sharp.
     
  9. Buttonboy

    Buttonboy Pianissimo User

    62
    16
    Sep 28, 2012
    Denmark
    I'd reccomend Chicowitz flow studies, by increasing the flow of air you will increase the amount of fundamental and overtones you obtain in the sound. It is a principal explained in Kristian Steenstrups book: teaching brass. Practice making your best sound in the mid range, don't force and play loud just because a loud sounds like a big sound. Instead using the exercises, work from g in the staff up to high c or further depending on your range but doing every exercise in every position. (the are in all transpositions of the original exercise) this will mean the 7 transposition begins on a c# and ends on a low f#. By focusing on making a very dark round sound throughout the registers, you will train your body to deliver the air in a bet Eddie isn't way. Try it as a first basics session in the day and let us know whether you seem some benefits!

    1 play round and dark in the mid range.

    2 expand the same sound to the high and low ranges!

    3 sing the exercises before you Play the. And in your head as you play them!

    Good luck!
     
  10. SmoothOperator

    SmoothOperator Mezzo Forte User

    857
    46
    Jul 14, 2010
    I think that is why they make four valve flugels, and trombones with triggers, is to cover that gap in the harmonics between the pedals.
     

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