Improving range and endurance

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by [email protected], Dec 9, 2011.

  1. GoodMusic@PA

    [email protected] Piano User

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    Aug 7, 2008
    Hello.
    I haven't posted here in a while but I just had some questions.
    I really need to improve my range and endurance. I have been putting this problem aside for a while but I really wanna go after it now. I started today with playing longtones/ lipslurs/scales very softly. Is this the way to approach it?
    A lot of people tell me I have a very dark, nice sound, but I really want to improve range and endurance so I can be a better overall player. I'm willing to work hard for this. Also, I play with a slight upper tilt and I think I am an upstream player, does this have anything to do with this?
    Any suggestions?
    Thanks!!
     
  2. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    playing longtones/ lipslurs/scales very softly - that's a very good start. Also good protein intake (to build and repair face muscle tissue) -- lots of patience with yourself - --- and a realistic expectation that both (range and endurance) won't happen overnight --- and I would say your well on your way!
     
  3. Mark_Kindy

    Mark_Kindy Mezzo Forte User

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    Range usually improves with endurance and proper breathing. Endurance improves with more playing. However, you have to be smart, and play more smaller sessions, so that your face gets a chance to rest. It's the idea of more reps, not max weight, that will strengthen your muscles.

    However, if you are not using your air efficiently, you may be putting more strain on your muscles than necessary, and may not need to build them. Instead, you would want to improve your efficiency.

    I would consider both possibilities. That's all I can give on that, although I concur with KT above
     
  4. codyb226

    codyb226 Banned

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    There is no way to improve your range overnight, unless someone isn't telling us something. I would do long tones and pedal tones. You must go down to go up. It builds up you facial muscles.
     
  5. Mark_Kindy

    Mark_Kindy Mezzo Forte User

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    Low also helps you maintain a relaxed inner lip. No need to force anything there, no need to force anything high.
    You can easily get up to high C, relaxed. We usually just tense up because we think "oh, it's high, it'll be hard"
     
  6. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    high range may not be difficult in principle -- but you still need all the aspects of the trumpet for both high and low --- you need the "outer" face muscles and embouchure to be able to support the "inner" small aperture --- the vibrating part of the lip that produces sound which needs to be flexible. So I agree that being able to hold long soft (and loud) notes below the staff is the "same feeling" as you need in the higher ranges. And endurance, and strength are needed.
    after all -- YOU need to be able to hold the aperture at the correct opening --for all notes -- and especially high notes!!!!!!!!
     
  7. GoodMusic@PA

    [email protected] Piano User

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    Aug 7, 2008
    Ok, Im willing to work for it and I know it doesn't happen overnight. The funny thing is im really good at pedal tones, just not the upper register. I think my problem is with efficiency and airstream but Im just going to work it out.
     
  8. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    I would look up Keith Fiala
    Trumpet High Note Help, Trumpet Lessons Online, Beginning Trumpet Lessons, Trumpet Books,
    he has a lot of good youtube vids and some great articles on his sight --- I think they can be very helpful in your quest for range, and endurance -- but they will cost you a lot -- a lot of practice time, yup - some things in life don't come cheap. let me add that I am a comeback player, having played for the last 3 years -- I am 47 so there are ups and downs on the physical side. BUT within 2 years+ or so with intelligent, focused, disciplined practice -- and of course over 2000 hours of practice time (2-3 hours a day) --- I went from a C scale in the staff, that sounded like crap ---- to a reliable full range (low F# below the staff --- and some pedals -- to a decently reproducable High A --- which is like the 5th space above the staff --- .
    NOW that is just my experience ---- and the time cost to get there ---- and then you have to talk about the time just to keep that range --- AND I MIGHT ADD for the skeptics out there --- the other part of the equation is endurance ---- which is not more than a few lines at best ---- and FOR ME --- maybe that is all there is, and maybe it won't last for too long --- I do not know --- I only know that there is a cost of many 1,000's of hours just to reach what many consider to be where a pro's range should be ----- and that is NOT playing like a pro at that range either --- just a thought so you could re-evaluate the time cost ratio, and how that might factor into what you are looking at... this is just my opinion, and may not be an actual representation for all ages, or all skill levels in their quest for range and endurance
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2011

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