In Defense of Amado (and other Plunger-Style) Water Keys

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by trumpetsplus, Oct 28, 2014.

  1. J. Jericho

    J. Jericho Fortissimo User

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    I prefer the Amado water keys because the shape follows the curvature of the tubing, since there is no reservoir, and I believe this does have an effect on the sound and the way the horn plays, albeit a very small effect. I also like them because they drain the water onto the floor, rather than onto my clothing. Each time I put my horn away I put three drops of valve oil on the cap side of the valve and press the button a few times to distribute the lubricant throughout the valve. I have had Amado valves on most of my horns for decades and have never had even a hint of a problem with them; they all work superbly.
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    The Pollard website is worth loking at. I wa immediately turned off by by the BS about sympathetic vibrations. I mean why do these idiots have to include total nonsense - like an Amado or standard water key spring vibrates noticably to any player on the planet.

    The danger with the conical design is that when dirt gets in, the cone can't seat and will leak air. Proof again that maintenance makes or breaks the performance - not necessarily the design!
     
  3. Brekelefuw

    Brekelefuw Fortissimo User

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    My problem with the Pollard key is that it is massive. It looked as if the 3rd slide key would hit the main tuning slide key with them on the horn.
     
  4. Culbe

    Culbe Forte User

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    Normal
  5. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    This is a shot at Saturn - they changed their actuating ring from brass to delrin because of customer complaints about this.
     
  6. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    It is a little tight to fit, but not too difficult (they are back to back).
     
  7. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    Absolutely.
     
  8. Ed Kennedy

    Ed Kennedy Forte User

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    I found that opening up the hole (in the Amado) one drill index size larger improved the water evacuation considerably. DON'T TRY THIS AT HOME. (You could end up with an extra hole in your tuning slide.)
     
  9. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    "Nothing that a tech for money couldn't fix!" he says as he counts the cash that he has made based on others decisions involving little intelligence........
     
  10. ConnDirectorFan

    ConnDirectorFan Fortissimo User

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    Funny you mentioned that - I simply ignored the sympathetic vibration stuff since [as you said] waterkeys have little to do with vibrations - I barely notice a difference in blow on Amado vs. non-Amado waterkey horns [the turbulence vs. "reservoir" idea].

    As for the conical design, perhaps they were a bit extreme - I played a 1980s Jupiter on a few occasions, and although this might have been poor manufacturing or wear, the Amado keys had a slight taper - they were not 100% cylindrical, but not completely conical, and they rarely stuck [stuck shut due to grime...!]

    Either way, I don't have a problem with either waterkey type.
     

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