In praise of... the F trumpet!

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Manny Laureano, Jan 9, 2007.

  1. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Manny,
    you are right, in Bruckners day they probably authentically split more notes.... and didn't kill as many people doing it!
    My Prana B2D mouthpiece works very well, the normal B2 is not in tune.
    Sunday we have a Mahler 8 rehearsal, I am going to experiment a bit. The Bb rotary is MUCH more secure!
     
  2. k0elw

    k0elw Guest

    Getzen used to make a 300 series F alto trumpet (not to be confused with frumpets, which use a french horn mouthpiece) . They show up on Ebay from time to time, usually mislabeled. A few years ago I got one for ~$150.00. I don't know how close an approximation this beast is of the 19th century orchestral low F trumpets. I think they (the Getzens) may have been tried as a replacement for french horn in marching bands. It uses a "conventional" trumpet mouthpiece; (bigger seems to work better, i.e. a Schilke 22).

    It is difficult to center in the upper register with any volume. I find it relaxing to practice in its lower and middle register, using Getchell Studies as written and Clarke Technical Studies. Practicing on this seems to have resulted in better security of attack in the lower register when I play on Bb or C trumpets.

    Pressing the 1st and 2nd valves down puts it in D; giving you a "gnatural trumpet" in D for all your favorite baroque tunes. The bell however is considerably larger than the bells of "real" gnatural trumpets.

    -Ellis
     
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I had one of those Getzens, it is a "student" quality instrument and you are right about its upper register. In a marching band it could also be used instead of an alto horn/french horn to keep the sound energy moving in the direction that you are marching.
    The real reason is that nobody used to want to play french horn parts, so they just declared them to be F-trumpet parts. Something for the offbeat trumpet players without high chops?
     
  4. k0elw

    k0elw Guest


    Isn't that the definition of a french horn player?

    -Ellis
     
  5. tromj

    tromj Piano User

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    But keep in mind that an F Alto trumpet is not the same as an F orchestral trumpet. It's a different bore configuration. A real bastardized instrument, basically. There are a bunch of good essays on the subject on the Antique Sound Workshop web site.
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2007
  6. trumpetmike

    trumpetmike Forte User

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    As an additional point of possible interest - some of the music for the recent Lord of the Rings films were performed on F trumpets.

    Certainly interesting to read other people's views on the more unusual pitch instrument.
     
  7. Petia

    Petia New Friend

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    Hello guys,

    I'm reviving this old thread about F trumpets because I learnt by reading it that some of you happen to play on historical low F intruments.
    I just bought a vintage czech low F (probably 1920s) and I'm trying to find the perfect mouthpiece to complement it. Right now my high register is too sharp with the Wick 1C I tried (octaves are too wide, if you prefer -and the tuning is too sharp overall, BTW). I was wondering if there was some catch with the old receiver/modern shank. Or maybe the cup of the 1C is still not deep enough / throat not wide enough for the low F?
    Any thoughts on this? What is your preferred mouthpiece to go with an historical low F?
    Thanks for your advice!

    P.
     
  8. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    If this is a standard orchestral F trumpet, there are plenty of high notes written for it. Huge mouthpieces probably are not the answer.

    There were several german standards for mouthpiece design at the turn of that century. Leipzig/Dresden had bowl shaped mouthpieces, Cologne had normal cup shapes, as did north Germany. Naturally there were other types of mouthpieces available everywhere, but a survey of those (surviving)old trumpet players that used Fs early in their careers was pretty representative.

    I have good luck with a Schilke 18 and my standard Monette B2D. I did not have any joy with a Bach 1C 1 1/4C or 1 1/2C. Didn't try anything else.

     
  9. Petia

    Petia New Friend

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    Thanks for your reply.
    I noticed on the Denis Wick web site that their 1X was modeled after a 1870 low F trumpet mouthpiece, and it is quite deep with a large throat (for modern tastes). So I wondered whether these kind of deep (more flugelhorn-style) mouthpieces would be more suited. But that may be a national bias: the english tradition seems to favor deep cups overall.
    I find some comfort in seeing that a 1C didn't cut it for you either. I'll try to test the Schilke 18 before the Monette ;-)
    In the meantime I contacted Egger in Switzerland as they make a modern copy of a late XIXth Ceverny low F trumpet. They've apparently also developed a special mouthpiece for it. For those interested, it's certainly swiss quality... expect a swiss price though!
    I'll keep you posted whenever I find the perfect mouthpiece for my antique low F...

    P.
     

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