Inconsistent Older Trumpet Player Here

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by deano56, Nov 24, 2013.

  1. VetPsychWars

    VetPsychWars Fortissimo User

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    Nov 8, 2006
    Greenfield WI
    I think it's the rest of the piece, in fact. For whatever reason, the Giardinelli piece is the first piece that really fit my horns like no other... and I've had a GR fitting. I literally pulled the 10C out of the box and my trumpet playing friend (hi Eric!) said "that is the most resonant I've ever heard you play." My trumpet teacher was very impressed. I've had Bach, Yamaha, Schilke, Kelly... none of those pieces ever sounded so good.

    I'm extremely curious to see whether the Kanstul Giardinelli copies would be the same... but at their prices, not ready to experiment. :-)

    Tom
     
  2. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    I wonder if the gap is just right inside of the receiver when you use that mouthpiece, or if it's just a good fit all around with player/mouthpiece/trumpet. Hey - my take is that if it works, then it works, and I don't question it too much. There are many threads about how horrible a mouthpiece the 14A4a is (specifically in regard to the rim and the cup) but that has been my best overall fit since about 1997. What I'd really like to do though is to have a 14A4 cut for sleeves so that I can really dial in the gap, but that's a couple hundred bucks, and for now, I "adust" my gap with some clear packing tape, which is weird because it's a Schilke mouthpiece in a Schilke trumpet - you'd think it would already be correct, right? It's not - bumping the gap out with the packing tape is just about right, or at least markedly better than what it is without it.
     
  3. Ed Kennedy

    Ed Kennedy Forte User

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    I used to have consistency problem with articulated entrances. The thing that really helped me iron it out was using the Stamp (James) Warmups. It involves freebuzzing with a pitch source (keyboard), followed by mouthpiece buzzing, then taking it to the horn. BTW those old LeBlancs are excellent instruments.
     
  4. VetPsychWars

    VetPsychWars Fortissimo User

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    Greenfield WI
    The Buescher horns are mostly gapless. In the 228 and 217 Lightweight 400s, the end of the mouthpipe is blended into the receiver. So insertion depth can make a difference but not as much as on a Bach, for example.

    So I think it's just a good fit between me, the mouthpiece, and the horn.

    Tom
     
  5. mrsemman

    mrsemman Piano User

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    Apr 8, 2010
    Massachusetts
    deano56,

    I just came back at the age of 60, and like you, wasn't sure that what I was taught at age 12 was the correct thing. My endurance sucked, but the tone was there. Even after a couple of years of lessons, I did not see much improvement. That said, last spring, I got a couple of Claude Gordon's books, "Brass Playing is as Easy as Deep Breathing", and the "Practical..." (sorry, my memory isn't what it used to be). I discovered a better embouchure method and use of the tongue arch. My endurance improved, as I wasn't blowing as hard to achieve the notes. Before you go into buying a new horn, look into a different mouthpiece. The Stork website has a library of lip types and recommendations for mouthpiece size. You can call Phyllis Stork and speak to her about what your needs and she can send you a trial pack to try several various mouthpieces. Web Page Under Construction

    Good luck,

    Gary
     
  6. deano56

    deano56 New Friend

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    Nov 23, 2013
    Morris, IL.
    I will not be purchasing a new horn anytime in the near future, I am somewhat encouraged with the progress as I keep on practising. I did practise with piano and electric keyboard at church yesterday and the sound in this church is very nice, my wife said. I am never comfortable in front of people, but I want to play there.
     
  7. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Baltimore/DC
    Deano, it sounds like you've got some good things going there. A performance outlet is a great way to keep yourself moving ahead and striving to be better than last time, and preparing for an eventual performance is a really great way to set attainable goals with set deadlines. You'll get out of it exactly what you want, and what you are willing to put into it.

    I have told this story many times over the years to various people, and if I looked, it's probably in one of my 3,800+ posts on here, but I've always thought it was a cool thing, so I'll share it again.

    One year I got booked to play an Easter job at a friend's church, and among the musicians there was a woman, probably in her mid to late 50s, with a flute. As the rehearsal before the service progressed, it became clear that this lady was a polished, professional level flautist.

    We got to chatting at breakfast after the rehearsal was over, and I asked her about her playing experience. As it turns out, she was a comeback player of a sort as well. She'd played flute in grade school and high school, and was pretty good at it, but she got married right out of high school, and so she stopped playing entirely in lieu of having several children and maintaining a household. 20+ years later when her last child was getting ready to head off to college, she decided she'd go to college as well, and she decided to pick the flute back up and try to get involved in the band program - she'd always enjoyed playing, so why not? Fast forward another 10-15 years when I met her, and she'd graduated with multiple degrees in music, and by the time I met her, she was teaching college level flute.

    Now how's that for a comeback story?
     

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