Increase endurance and range the easy way

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by mhendricks, Jan 30, 2014.

  1. Jolter

    Jolter Piano User

    413
    129
    Apr 1, 2009
    Sweden
    Right, I think I see. Easy as in "not complicated" or "simple", not easy as in "quicker". =) Thanks for writing this down for the rest of us, I have good experiences of "soft playing" as improving my range, so I really think you're on to something.
     
  2. arielredhunter

    arielredhunter Pianissimo User

    Age:
    79
    60
    24
    Feb 11, 2014
    Akwesasne, New York
    Wow, I'm impressed. I do that same thing, but I do it because I'm such a poor reader. So I learn a tune I want to play just like you said, four bars at a time, the rest between is while I re-read it while humming it out loud. Then I play it again to get the notes out at the pace I hear in my head. And work through the tune the same way. After reading your schooling on this, perhaps I've been lucky to never have been a "sight reader", because I'm entirely self taught.
     
  3. mhendricks

    mhendricks Pianissimo User

  4. arielredhunter

    arielredhunter Pianissimo User

    Age:
    79
    60
    24
    Feb 11, 2014
    Akwesasne, New York
    Sho' nuff - - will do! :D
     
  5. mhendricks

    mhendricks Pianissimo User

    To arielredhunter...

    This also helps sight reading :-)

    When practicing like this, be sure to make each note "excellent". Don't let yourself
    accept bobbled notes or "approximaturas" :-)

    This way of practicing lets you apply all of the things we practice, but putting it into
    a music framework.

    Looking forward to reading everyone's comments and progress.

    Mark
     
  6. arielredhunter

    arielredhunter Pianissimo User

    Age:
    79
    60
    24
    Feb 11, 2014
    Akwesasne, New York
    That's why I repeat the four bar "phrase". While I don't know what an approximentura is, I work to get out the clams and honkers. I learned out of a school band book (I think Belwin) and hanging around N.O. a little bit. I learned to only go to Bourbon Street to be entertained. I picked up what little I know at Preservation Hall and other places in the Quarter. I downloaded your book, and love it. But I want a hard copy if it is in a spiral binding so it lays flat. I think it's a great teaching aid.
     
  7. arielredhunter

    arielredhunter Pianissimo User

    Age:
    79
    60
    24
    Feb 11, 2014
    Akwesasne, New York
    I was surprised to find out that playing "B" in the staff was incorrect using the third valve. When a Berkeley student (40 years younger than me) told me I was doing it all wrong, I asked him what was the third valve for if not to be used.
     
  8. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

    16,404
    7,515
    Dec 22, 2008
    Virginia
    An approximentura is a note-ish sound most easily recognized in singers! ;-) It can slip into the trumpet realm during sightreading of music. Upon my return 8+ years ago I was very unfamiliar with E#, B#, Cb, and Fb. I play in a church band so there where many approximenturas until I worked on those keys. I also learned that the singers most used musical term is maybeoso!! :cool:
     
  9. mhendricks

    mhendricks Pianissimo User

    Yes.... "approximaturas" equals "clams and clunkers"

    A little play on the real musical word... Appoggiatura (otherwise known as a grace note).

    Approximaturas, however are not graceful :-) ... nor desired. :-)

    Mark
     
  10. mhendricks

    mhendricks Pianissimo User

    Arielredhunter,

    The 3rd finger print copy books can be bought here.

    MPH Music - Mark Hendricks - MPHmusic.com

    Once you get them, if you want them to lay complete flat, take
    it to your local Staples and the copy center can make
    them into a wire-bind format for just a few bucks... all
    will lay completely flat then. You could have them put
    both books into one wire-bound book for you.

    Mark Hendricks
     

Share This Page