increasing 2&3tonguing speed

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by trumpetnick, Sep 8, 2006.

  1. trumpetnick

    trumpetnick Fortissimo User

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    Manny,

    I would like to increase the speed of my tonguing but not sure what is to be done exactly. Do you have any proposals on aproach or exercises to use? I am actually preparing a concert with many pieces (it is actually something between recital and chamber music concert) including some french pieces like Arban's carnival and Jolivet Concertino among others. Sometimes I feel I would like to go faster but my tonguing is not really following (especially in the 2nd variation of the Carnival).

    Nick
     
  2. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    The most important thing, Nick, is to keep the tongue close to the front of the mouth. If you have large action of the tongue it will slow you down. Keep the distance short, in other words.

    ML
     
  3. cornetguy

    cornetguy Mezzo Forte User

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    as above, i would also suggest arbans or salvo slow to fast with mr. metronome. listening for evenness and clarity

    don jacoby in his book suggests for pieces like the carnival of venice to use a t d g. i found it does make it more fluid and can triple faster. the double is t g. this is not for fanfare playing only for extended 2 & 3 tongue passages.
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2006
  4. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    assuming you practice diligently, if you have reached a speed limit, you need to check all the factors that could cause it.
    One is tongue position as Manny said. Dave Monettes' web site has great info on body usage. I find on days where my body is tense, the speed goes down. Yoga can be very helpful here.
    I have also noticed on a good cornet, all of the Arban/Clarke stuff is much easier to play than on a modern large bore trumpet. The sound fits better too!
    Mouthpieces with bored out throats have slowed colleagues of mine down. I don't mean all mouthpieces with large throats, Monette, Curry and the likes can balance a mouthpiece with a large throat. I mean people that drill out their pieces and don't balance the cup and backbore afterwards.
     
  5. andredub

    andredub Pianissimo User

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    fast stuff

    Something that works really well for myself is doing tounging on the mouthpiece. I generally do a minute of double and triple (with a break between!) at a comfortable tempo so I can keep it steady. Then 30 seconds of each as fast as possible, then finish it off with another 15 seconds of each slow and rythmic. After that just bump up the times on each, and all this without the horn, just the mouthpiece.

    Hope that helps,

    Andre
     
  6. trumpettrax

    trumpettrax Piano User

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    It's seems to be very difficult for me to keep my tongue close to the front. I'm so used to tonguing back further. Will it get easier as I MAKE myself tongue closer? Does it just become a habit?

    Trax
     
  7. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Relax and let your tongue "melt", especially at its base (It goes a long way down.) At first your tonguing will sound too legato, but give your body time to catch up with your tongue and you'll get that true staccato that is a short legato. If you get a chance, kiss some cute horn players -- it may not increase your speed, but it sure is fun!
     
  8. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Jerry,

    You have a terrific way of expressing esoteric concepts: "tongue melting"... excellent!

    ML
     
  9. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Thanks, but it is a concept I stole from Karl Sievers who most likely got it from Bill Adam. Funny how most of things we have to do correctly in order to play trumpet are the exact opposite of our natural inclinations (except for annoying violists).
     

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