Input Please: Why Is The Tongue Used In The Upper Register?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Pedagogy' started by Dr.Mark, Mar 6, 2015.

  1. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Oh, by the way, none of the extrinsic tongue muscles attach to the upper jaw (required to "lift" the oral cavity). The extrinsic muscles attach to the following locations:

    an insertion at the mandible that protrudes the tongue forward to keep the owner from swallowing the tongue (unless you are drunk or unconscious then of course you die)
    the hyoid bone that depresses the tongue (I guess tongues do get sad sometimes)
    the styloid process that elevates and retracts the tongue (Kingtrumpet needs to use this more often when retracting statements he makes instead of posting three laughing emoticons that are kicking after swallowing their tongue)
    the palatine aponeurosis elevating the back of the tongue (right before letting loose of the spit wad)
     
  2. Dr.Mark

    Dr.Mark Mezzo Forte User

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    Hi G-Man,
    Does unhinging your jaw really make your sound bigger?
    It always did mine.
    Dr.Mark
     
  3. Dr.Mark

    Dr.Mark Mezzo Forte User

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    Hi Gxman,
    Yes, I've heard of Maggio and I think it's great that you get a second opinion.
    Dr.Mark
     
  4. Dr.Mark

    Dr.Mark Mezzo Forte User

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    I was being a wiseguy, sorry about that, my humor button needs a dusting. Yes, using the muscles that faciliate chewing, requires movement of the jaw. When this is done, the cavity where the air flows will increase and decrease depending on "aaaaa" or "EEEEEE". Moving the chin puts the lips closer/further which allows the individual to change the aperture which when coupled with a faster or slower air stream can change the pitch.
    Yes!! I like Cider!! Did you know my neighbor, Aryoo Deapen has started his own brand? It should be interesting!
    Dr.Mark
     
  5. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    And it gives bigger profits for my ENT physician!
     
  6. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    I am sure she is be-cider herself.
     
  7. Old Bugle Boy

    Old Bugle Boy Pianissimo User

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    Ha ha. My wife prefers a Dickens Cider ...
     
  8. Gxman

    Gxman Piano User

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    Hi Mark,

    I had a look over page 1 and 2 in Charles Collings Advanced Lip Flexibilities, and found many interesting things there regarding tongue, the importance of it being in the correct position etc. How this is vital to someone wanting to become a fluent and good trumpet player. Basically everything I have found to work, how the tongue used correctly brings the jaw up etc (as found in this thread)... I have now read on the first 3-4 pages of Charles Collings Advanced Lip Flexibilities. Also states how many misunderstand the importance of this and thus fail to ever reach the top potential. It is also interesting to read about, some people say "but he is gifted" "he was just born to be able to play legendary" - Perhaps as stated, it has nothing to do with that but rather "he learned the proper way and dedicated his time to the proper methods that have made him legendary".

    Reading a little about Mendez may put some of that into focus. Here is what David Hickman has stated:

    " On a day off from touring, Mendez would get up in the morning and head straight to his home studio to practice. Still in his pajamas, he would begin playing an eight bar passage that he did not feel was 100% consistent. He often taped himself on a professional 15 inch per minute recorder. Many of these tapes are in the Rafael Mendez Library, and I have marveled at them.

    He would play the passage, rest, play it again, rest, etc. for hours. After playing this passage hundreds of times, his wife, Amor, would come into his studio with his lunch. After gulping down the meal, he would immediately go back to the same practice, that would continue into the late afternoon.

    By 4:00 pm or so, [his wife] Amor would be going crazy from hearing the same passage thousands of times. She once went into his studio, and rather upset asked him why he continued to play the same thing over and over when it sounded perfect every time. His response was, “Because I still have to think about it.” Mendez said that he didn’t feel a passage was consistent under all conditions until it was as easy as saying one, two, three. . . no conscious thought needed at all!

    Most of the time, when Amor was going crazy from Ralph’s practice, she would call one of his good friends and ask the person to call the house to invite Ralph out for a few beers. This was the only way to get Ralph to stop practicing, get dressed, and give her some peace of mind.

    I heard this story from both of Rafael’s sons, Robert and Ralph Jr., many times. I thought that it was probably exaggerated, but when I heard the tapes I knew it was true. I think all professional musicians practice the same way Mendez did, but most (like me), stop practicing a passage when it can be played perfectly maybe ten times in a row. Rafael took this to the extreme, which is probably why he played better and more consistently than everyone else. Rafael told his sons that people thought he was a musical genius, but he insisted that he merely practiced harder than others. Personally, I think it was both. "


    Even Mendez himself didn't think he was a 'musical genius' (therefor born with the gift to be a world class player) but rather insisted that he simply practiced harder/more than others. Which means, we too could develop to play like that, if, we put the hours in that he did. I also believe there is gift involved but sometimes feel one places too much emphasis on the gift and thus cut themselves short of what they could have achieved.

    I suggest whoever has not read or has the Charles Collings Advanced Lip Flexibilities book, to get it and read those first few pages. That will prevent many a nightmare in the long run.
     
  9. Dr.Mark

    Dr.Mark Mezzo Forte User

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    Yes! I agree. In fact, a poverty version of lip flexibilies exist in a document called The Basics Sheet. It's not like Colin but it achieves the same thing, flexibility. It's the section called the 7 Valve Combinations.
    Great to hear from someone that's interested in Mendez and lip slurs.
    Dr.Mark
     
  10. Gxman

    Gxman Piano User

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    I do not know too much about Mendez... I have only listened to his Haydn pieces and Bumblebee. I believe he was 6 years old when he got told "You will be a cornet player" (based on one youtube video about him describing the smooth operator etc).

    Having said that, it is my aspiration to eventually be able to articulate as good as he did. To have that choppiness between notes when desired. I have listened to many other trumpet players playing the Haydn pieces and if I would like to be like anyone, it is Mendez. The notes are just so clear/distinct and not mushed into each other like most other players I have heard. There is just something about his articulation that I want to reproduce.

    If I can have Mendez type articulation, Chris Botti smoothness/emotion and Maurice Andre's classical/Baroque repertoire... Well... lets see what 20 years brings :D
     

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