Input Please: Why Is The Tongue Used In The Upper Register?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Pedagogy' started by Dr.Mark, Mar 6, 2015.

  1. Dr.Mark

    Dr.Mark Mezzo Forte User

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    Hi Gxman,
    Excluding time and fate, the only thing that will get in your way of accomplishing your goal is yourself. Be sure to listen to your teacher and practice, practice, practice. I will leave you with this. It's better to move someone with your music than impress them with a bunch of technique.
    Good luck
    Dr.Mark
     
  2. Gxman

    Gxman Piano User

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    That is why I added Botti in it.

    I too am a fan of music that is 'felt' through, rather than just a bunch of technical notes that don't really say anything. In fact, to play that moving is difficult, because to express one-self in that way, is harder than playing fast notes. I also think that by mixing things up makes the moving music more moving. If everything played is just that, it becomes stale and uninteresting. Loses it's impact.

    I believe in being well rounded. Articulate sharply when needed, be technical when needed, be moving when needed.

    My mindset is "master the instrument" so that whatever is called for, I can do well. That is why i mentioned those 3 players. I think the combination of those 3 = technical, articulate, expressive.

    So that is my goal to be a rounded player that can make you impressed or make you cry or make you awe with wonder.

    Shouldn't that be the goal of every trumpet player? Sounds logical.
     
  3. Dr.Mark

    Dr.Mark Mezzo Forte User

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    Hi Gxman,
    You stated:
    "So that is my goal to be a rounded player that can make you impressed or make you cry or make you awe with wonder.
    Shouldn't that be the goal of every trumpet player?
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    You're kidding, right? Trumpet isn't much different than any of the other instruments. My experience has been that most trumpet players are far too busy trying to impress with techinque (how fast, high, or loud). I realize that a musician must go through a progression (me included) and part of that process is to learn the notes and the mechanics but most never get to the point that we are talking about. What you're talking about is rare air for any artist. How do you know you're getting it right? Do you get goosebumps when you play? Do members of the audience sit attentively as you play and quickly applaude when you're finished? Do people line up after the show to shake your hand and get get a selfie or autograph? Do you make people cry?
    That's how you know you're getting it right.
    Here's all you need to do:
    Take a song, internalize it and convey the message of that song to others by blowing through plumbing.
    Dr.Mark
     
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  4. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Wow, such powerful thoughts Dr.Mark as usual. Case in point: Check out young Victor Haskin's posts here on TM (he made one earlier this week). They are of videos of his amazing technique that builds on theory with expert precision and execution. The let down I have when listening to the videos, is that they lack passion. They resonate with technique but are void of emotion. Sorry Victor, but this will come as you live life, feel the trials and tribulations that life will give you as we mature. So the emotion will come.

    If you want a faster track to playing with more tear jerking emotion, listen to Till Bronner's playing and how he weaves lyrical jazz improvisation into the chord changes behind a song. Chris Botti has this same skill with more traditional rudimentary application. Then listen to Arturo that breaths fire and passion leaving the audience with the feeling of exhilarating exhaustion that one gets from a refreshing athletic work out. Combine these skills, and goosebumps will grow on goosebumps. I'll take goosebumps over tongue action any day.
     
  5. Dr.Mark

    Dr.Mark Mezzo Forte User

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    Hi G-man,
    You stated:
    " I'll take goosebumps over tongue action any day."
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    I concur.
    Dr.Mark
     
  6. Gxman

    Gxman Piano User

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    Jan 21, 2010
    Thanks Mark,

    Sounds like I'm on the right track then. For me its the fancy technical stuff that I find difficult, while playing with feeling I find natural.
     
  7. gunshowtickets

    gunshowtickets Forte User

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    This thread is great, guise. It made me really conscious of what my tongue's doing. I have a handicap- a severe open bite- my front teeth hardly support my embouchure. My tongue compensates by supporting my lower lip, just behind my lower teeth.
    I had orthodontics when I was a teenager to close it, so I learned how to play with very light pressure. When I got the appliances out, I could play fantastically, technique-wise. However, the gap reopened and I'm having to re-learn with a much altered technique. I don't think my tonguing can be compared fairly with the average person's.
    I wouldn't say I'm anywhere near where I was ten years ago, but i think i have learned more about music in that time, especially about internalising music and bringing it to life with expressiveness. Ironically, my brother called me in the middle of my practicing today and said, "Well, at least your playing is a lot better than when you were in high school. We should start a jazz band."
    I had been playing Arban Characteristic Study 12 as a warmup, just before he called, i had decided to play Carnival of Venice an octave higher than written to get used to the upper register slotting on my new .469 bore horn. I recorded some of it and it was far from technically sound, but it had *soul* and that was enough to garner a compliment from somebody who is characteristically a very negative person.
    Honestly, I didn't even think about what my tongue was doing. It just did it UNTIL fatigue set in after the eighth or ninth go of it, then I noticed how much my tongue was doing structurally, as far as bracing the lips, but only the tip. The rest of my tongue was depressed and not as high in my palette as I would have thought.

    Now I have an idea what MY tongue does, time to go work on that Mendez-style articulation.
     
  8. Dr.Mark

    Dr.Mark Mezzo Forte User

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    It certainly does! For the fancy technical stuff, what works for me? I think soft and light. A lot of times the soft technical stuff is really difficult because the muscles tighten and the air becomes forced which can make the articulations blatty. Technical stuff has the ability to make us (or at least me) tense up but that's kinda reasonable. Heck, I've seen classical music that looked more like a bunch of black ants on a page than it did music. The thing that sometimes throws me is the font that's used. Hey!! A new study!!
    Does different fonts effect the tension level of the musican reading it.
    Dr.Mark
     
  9. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    I once presented my students with a bunch of Christmas carols. In order to get all of them on one page I used a small font, and the students, without exception, played them all softly.
     
  10. Dr.Mark

    Dr.Mark Mezzo Forte User

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    Hi VB,
    Wow! Wouldn't it be cool to discover if font size, font type and color can have a direct effect on how we play! Double Wow!!
    I smell a dissertation with this one and setting up the research shouldn't be that tough.
    If someone wants to grab this research topic up, all I ask is if you can, let us know what you found.
    This could lead to (for lack of a better description) font standardization!
    Thanks VB!
    Dr.Mark
     

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