Instrument Maintenance

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Comeback, Jul 10, 2013.

  1. Comeback

    Comeback Forte User

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    Fort Wayne, IN
    Having spent several years in Environmental, Health & Safety Management, I have always been cognizant of the value of clean brass-winds. A little web searching easily turns up articles from authoritative sources explaining consequences of playing filthy unwashed instruments, and those consequences ain't pretty!

    Today I am washing the four instruments I use most frequently: a 1990 Blessing Artist flugelhorn; a 1952 Blessing Super Artist Bb trumpet; a 1972 Getzen Eterna Severinsen Bb trumpet; and a 2000 Bach Stradivarius 180S37 Bb trumpet. Today I noticed something I had overlooked before. The Strad is the easiest of the four to maintain! This apparently has to do with radii and tubing alignment. Whatever it is, the ease of maintenance is something I appreciate. Also, my Strad has silver-plated inside slide surfaces, which means that the oligodynamic properties of silver help keep my trumpet clean between washings. Ease of maintenance and silver-plated inside slide surfaces may be features worth considering when shopping for a new or different instrument.

    Jim
     
  2. Churchman

    Churchman Mezzo Piano User

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    and, for those with loads of dosh, gold-plating can act to kill bacteria in the correct circumstances. This is why many church communion cups are plated inside with it.
     
  3. Peter McNeill

    Peter McNeill Utimate User

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    And we know Cleanliness is next to Godliness.

    Also a good reason for gold plated mouthpieces.
     
  4. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    That does it, I am getting the rest of my mouth pieces gold plated!
     
  5. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    My Getzen flugelhorn cleans the easiest. It is silver plated. And now that I soak it in an bicarbonate/aluminum/salt hot water bath at the end of cleaning, the shine AND valve function has NEVER been better. AND I have saved TONS on elbow grease, and at my age, that's quit a savings!
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2013
  6. Dean_0

    Dean_0 Piano User

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    And that toxic bath salts doesn't hurt the finish or the insides?????

    Dean_0
     
  7. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    If you're referring to the horn... no... No harm done at all.

    If you are referring to me... after a few skin grafts, and a stomach pumping-followed by a proton pump inhibitor, I'm doing fine, thank you very much.
     
  8. Dean_0

    Dean_0 Piano User

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    Yup when all else fails ,read the instructions ??:shock:

    Dean_0
     
  9. Ian000450

    Ian000450 Pianissimo User

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    Oklahoma, USA
    Gmonady, may I ask what your instrument cleaning process is? I have only heard of using some dish washing liquid in the bath, so I am very intrigued!
     
  10. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Dayton, Ohio
    It depends on the horn, but some of the cleaning follows the same initial process.

    Dish washing soap in tepid water, all parts soaked after entire horn is disassembled.
    While parts are soaking, caps are hand cleaned with soap water paper towel.
    Pludgets of soaked paper towels are coiled through the valve ports.
    Wire brush are run through all tubing
    All valves and caps are entirely immersed in 91% isopropyl alcohol and left to sit for 10 minutes

    SILVER PLATED GETZEN: Main body and slides are resoaked in a HOT water bicarbonate soda and salt bath with all pieces laid out on a sheet of aluminum foil lining the sides and base of the vat
    After this, the final isopropyl alcohol rinse below is done

    FINAL STAGES FOR ALL HORNS
    All slides are filled with 91% isopropyl alcohol and left to sit for 10 minutes
    The 91% isopropyl alcohol is then run through the main section of the trumpet and drained into a container. This rinse of the main horn is done 3 times with previously collected alcohol.

    POST-FINAL STAGE for MARTIN COMMITTEE:
    The horn is re-assembled BEFORE valves are oiled. The entire horn is filled to the bell with water. Taken outside with finger holding water in the leadpipe, the water is blown through the entire horn with valves being played. The first valve slide is then greased (as below) AND additionally valve oil is applied to the first valve slide ONLY.

    After this point all pieces are valves are oiled and slides re-attached using Ultrapure slide grease, regular grade for most, light grade for moving slides that have triggers.
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2013

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