Interesting subject?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by NYCO10, Aug 19, 2010.

  1. NYCO10

    NYCO10 Pianissimo User

    163
    8
    Feb 20, 2010
    United Kingdom
    Hi guys, Pops from trumpet college states the 'If you can buzz a double c then you should be able to play a triple c.' and i was wondering whether this counts in all ranges. Ie if you can only lip buzz up to a D in the stave (which i can) thats means you have the potential/ should be able to play to high D (which i can!) but i can go no higher with out the sound cracking and it being uncontrollable? so would you say Pops' statement is correct? and what are your views on this?


    Thanks:play:
     
  2. wiseone2

    wiseone2 Artitst in Residence Staff Member

    3,418
    373
    Nov 19, 2003
    Brooklyn,NY
    In all the years I have played, in all the situations I have been in, I have NEVER had to play a double C.
    I am amazed at players that pride themselves on having a double C that have rotten sounds and lack the basic trumpet skills.
    Practice to make music, not squeaks. For most players a double C is USELESS!!!!!!!
    Wilmer
     
  3. NYCO10

    NYCO10 Pianissimo User

    163
    8
    Feb 20, 2010
    United Kingdom
    No disrespect but i dont think you understood the question!! if you can buzz this note then will you be able to play to the octave above it?:thumbsup:
     
  4. wiseone2

    wiseone2 Artitst in Residence Staff Member

    3,418
    373
    Nov 19, 2003
    Brooklyn,NY
    My point is...... Can you play the trumpet?
    Sorry to sound smart ass.
    Wilmer
     
  5. wiseone2

    wiseone2 Artitst in Residence Staff Member

    3,418
    373
    Nov 19, 2003
    Brooklyn,NY
    High notes will come in time........learn to play. There are no tricks to trumpet playing.
    Wilmer
     
  6. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

    6,793
    3,560
    Oct 26, 2003
    Baltimore/DC
    No disrespect, but did you understand the point Wilmer was making about not needing a double C? Do you even know who Wilmer IS? If you don't, do a Google search. Once you've done that, you'll realize that between worrying about whether there is a relationship between buzzing and double C, and what Wilmer wrote to you, you should listen to Wilmer.

    While there is undboutedly a mechanical aspect to playing trumpet, in the grand scheme of things, shouldn't the goal be to get to a point to where the mechanical and technical aspects of playing are overshadowed or even forgetten about entirely due to the MUSIC that is being played?
     
  7. NYCO10

    NYCO10 Pianissimo User

    163
    8
    Feb 20, 2010
    United Kingdom
    I dont see double C as playing the trumpet, it is just another cool thing that you can do on the instrument (like half-valve, growling etc). i also didnt write any about a double C (that was a quote from Pops' website), i was asking about the relationship between buzzing and range.
     
  8. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,616
    7,962
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    This is pure BS. Buzzing tells you NOTHING about what happens with the horn. There are plenty of claims about all sorts of things, the bottom line is that high notes that can actually be used in a real playing situation are not learned or preserved by buzzing.

    For the moderately technical: When we play a trumpet, our buzz starts a resonance in the horn. Those resonances are called slots by some. The resonance of the horn puts air pressure on the front of our lips and helps to compensate for the air pressure from the inside created by blowing. When we practice intelligently and enough the face muscles can interact with those pressures and lets us play a wide variety of notes. The horn is long enough to keep our buzzing in its resonant range.

    When we buzz on a mouthpiece, there generally is no slotting (except for perhaps one or 2 exteremely high notes). The acoustic length of the mouthpiece is simply too short. There is no pressure wave from the front, the muscles have to work in a completely different way to keep from "flapping". That can really mess our playing up. Fine trumpet playing needs fine motor skills not a face that looks like mister universes biceps.

    If you "only" have a high D, your problem is not buzzing. It is some or a combination of the following: excessive pressure, bad breathing, bad body use, little understanding of the music you are trying to play, very dirty trumpet, tenor saxophone.

    There is a lot of money to be made by promising high chops. Only when those promising can spark the MUSICAL FIRE in the player, are the claims defendable. In many cases, it is only a very lucrative baby sitting fee with no real results.

    Wilmer the professional, is the guy that you should be listening and paying attention to. He unlike most others that will post here is where we all really would like to be - respected by our peers and the one you call when you need the job done.
     
  9. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

    6,793
    3,560
    Oct 26, 2003
    Baltimore/DC
    I totally understood what you were asking, and believe me, when I was your age I was asking the same kinds of things. However, the truth is that it just doesn't matter whether there is a relationship between mouthpiece buzzing and range - who really cares?

    I've always seen mouthpiece and leadpipe buzzing as being unrelated and potentially detrimental to trumpet playing and it goes along with what Rowuk said about the fact that the lips and muscles of the face have to work in a completely different way than how they work when playing the whole trumpet.

    I know you aren't getting your question answered like you want, but ultimately, does it really matter?
     
  10. bigtiny

    bigtiny Mezzo Forte User

    939
    210
    Aug 14, 2005
    You'll get much farther concentrating on the fundamentals over the long term than worrying about buzzing or playing ultra high notes. It's just a waste of time. The only advantage to buzzing is that it's a way to slightly warm up or loosen the chops in a quieter manner than playing the horn (though it's by no means quiet). Work on your breathing, lip slurs, long tones and the rest of it and you'll play as high as you'll ever need to....and probably with a much better sound and musicality.

    bigtiny
     

Share This Page