Interesting tuning anomaly

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by GordonH, May 24, 2006.

  1. kitjacoby

    kitjacoby New Friend

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    Jan 5, 2006
    Cornwall, England
    I can't remember who it was (probably Thomas Beecham), but a conductor asked the orchestra to tune. The oboeist gave them an A, and the conductor said "Ladies and Gentlemen, take your pick."

    BOOM BOOM.

    Ahem.

    K
     
  2. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Sep 29, 2004
    USA
    That's interesting, Gordon in light of an experience I had with Dave Monette many years ago.

    He came to Orchestra Hall many years ago and I wanted to check somethng with the tuner we have there (a rather expensive looking German-made device). With disdain he looked at it and said "No, wait a sec...". He went to his bag of stuff and pulled out a few tuning forks, and he said "Okay, let's start again". We made our adjustments with the tuning forks instead of the machine and its readout.

    After all, we do tune to the oboe and not a machine once we get on stage. When I tune, it's the tuning note (A), a fourth below, the tuning note again, a fifth above, an octave above and a quick arpeggio downwards. That's a general guide to my tuning, folks, not a strict routine every single time.

    ML
     
  3. camelbrass

    camelbrass Mezzo Forte User

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    Nov 5, 2003
    Dubai, UAE
    It seems that you can't beat a trained (as in the sense of experienced) ear. I'd have to agree.


    Regards,


    Trevor
     
  4. connloyalist

    connloyalist Pianissimo User

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    May 1, 2006
    Netherlands
    For the first 10 years of my trumpet playing, the band had a conductor who never used a tuner (he didn't like'em for reasons I don't really remember), and always tuned the orchestra, each player individually, by (his) ear. Sounded great.

    Then when he left the new conductor always used an electronic tuner. I found that rather strange the first time I saw that. The next conductor only tuned the band when we had a concert, and then only when it was useful to do so (i.e. not in cold weather outdoors). The current conductor does use one. In fairness though, I haven't seen any strange tuning stuff like described here though. Except the usual stuff of having to pull or push in the tuning slide, overshoot and end up right back where you started.

    I do know an alto saxophone player who to me always sounds a bit flat on her solos. Not sure why that is.

    Regards, Christine
     
  5. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Sep 29, 2004
    USA
    Only one?

    ML
     
  6. cornetguy

    cornetguy Mezzo Forte User

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    Sep 12, 2005
    Saint Paul, MN
    i use a tuner only to find tendancies of horn or to confirm what i think i am hearing, but not 100% sure, when i do it is a very good korg. i find the noise maker on it to be more helpful then the needle, it will drive you wacko if you spend too much time focusing on the needle.
     
  7. Billy B

    Billy B Pianissimo User

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    Nov 5, 2004
    Des Moines, IA
    My theory is that legit sax is supposed to make you feel uncomfortable.
     
  8. pwillini

    pwillini Pianissimo User

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    Mar 4, 2004
    Kalamazoo, MI
    We battle this tuning issue each week in our small church orchestra (2 trumpets, tuba, 2 baritones, trombone, horn, alto sax, oboe, clarinet and 2 flutes) We can never get a consistent note in tune due to experience level and a flute player who insists on tuning while STAREING at the tuner, lipping the note up and and down until she gets it "right"

    Last week I had everyone start tuning to a Bb major triad, without a tuner anywhere in site. It's amazing what happened then, when we got people to use there ears and not their eyes to tune. After all that's what it's about, the ears!
     
  9. Billy B

    Billy B Pianissimo User

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    Nov 5, 2004
    Des Moines, IA
    I find that tuning to a minor 7th chord works well.
     

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