Intonation, a reality check.

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by turtlejimmy, Jan 19, 2011.

  1. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    Interesting the way threads have a break for a couple of years then someone finds them and breathes new life - reflects Comeback Trumpeters I suppose?
     
  2. Peter McNeill

    Peter McNeill Utimate User

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    Yep,
    For a moment, I thought the Turtle had returned to trumpet playing. Oh well. KORG TM-40 is a great unit for checking tuning and for setting as a metronome.

    Ears are still best, but sometimes I literally cannot hear myself in a group, so I carry a clip-on tuner in the bag as well.
    Resus...resus....resus... ALL CLEAR>> POW
     
  3. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    This is only true when playing with other wind instruments. If a trumpet plays with a bluegrass band, odd as that might sound, the trumpet needs to be IN TUNE, because the other instruments will be extremely in tune. It's almost always that it's only wind instruments that are all over the map, tuning wise. Guitars, pianos, basses, keyboards, strings, drums, etc .... are instruments that play in tune.


    Turtle
     
  4. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    I'll remember that the next time a bluegrass band invites me to play trumpet with them...
     
  5. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    Does wind instrument include singers!!! ROFL
     
  6. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Singers are wind instruments without slides. And sorry, Dale, but bluegrass was just the first super in-tune thing I could think of. I don't even like bluegrass. I'd rather listen to something that was out of tune, even a singer :)shock:), than in-tune bluegrass. My bad.


    Turtle
     
  7. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    I actually like bluegrass - my younger brother played in a bluegrass band (Dog River Boys) for years. I just didn't think there was much call for a trumpet in one, though...:D But I do get your point.
     
  8. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Intonation is probably the main reason I've drifted away from trumpet, to moonlight with the sax. With good relative pitch, it was often maddening for me to hear how out of tune I was on trumpet, without being able to fix it, or fix it easily or quickly enough. So many factors go into being on pitch with trumpet, including air support, embouchure, the note you're thinking about, your mental state and outlook on life, etc. It was very often frustrating. The sax, by comparison, is a more straight ahead instrument, with a more constant embouchure through the registers ... If the horn is in tune, you end up sounding in tune, after a little embouchure strength and solidness of the lower lip. Also, it's a more spread sound, generally (at least with a tenor) than the trumpet so being off a little isn't nearly as noticeable :)-P). All in all, a more satisfying experience, intonation-wise. At least, so far ...


    Turtle
     
  9. B-Flat Cat

    B-Flat Cat Pianissimo User

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    Having played trumpet with both piano and organ accompaniment, I can vouch for the need to play in tune in those situations. My wife, a professional flutist, has to really pay attention to intonation when playing in combination with piano, guitar, or harp. With strings, it's only the fretted instruments that require a wind player to nail the intonation. Violins, cellos, etc. can be all over the place. I've heard mediocre violinists with great tuners and bad ears who can only hit a true pitch when playing an open string and never find a relative pitch in an ensemble.

    All of my playing these days is on cornet in a brass band. At rehearsals, there are a lot of tuners (mine is a Korg TM-40 with a contact mic) on the stands during warm-up. The idea is to have a common starting point. We all think we're in tune, but those of us lacking perfect pitch want to make sure. The tuners are back in the cases before the first downbeat and everyone is using their ears like ensemble musicians are supposed to.
     
  10. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    Yes, all this makes sense - but it doesn't stop my spine from tingling when the trumpet section hit the chord and it is as one - glorious. It's like golf really, it's those "goodies" that keep me coming back.
     

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