Intonation, a reality check.

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by turtlejimmy, Jan 19, 2011.

  1. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    ROFL



    Turtle
     
  2. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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  3. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    My private teacher echoed this first statement. He's wanting me to sing the song, exercise, scale first to get it into my ears, and then play it on the trumpet. He feels like, in this way, you get the notes in your head, and can hear them there, it's easier to hit the notes and play in tune.

    That last one (#10) is just common sense.:dontknow:

    Turtle
     
  4. hahkeystah

    hahkeystah Piano User

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    i actually noticed this for myself during practice the other day. (after watching that tine thing helseth video - nice jumps!) especially since i'm learning with a mute in, its even more important to hear the note before you play it. without it, my notes sound shaky, and i have trouble hitting anything. if i can hear the note in my head first, it comes out clear as glass. (and when i take the mute out then play? look out baby lol)
     
  5. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    After quite a lot of experimenting with the KORG tuner on my jazz recordings, I've come to these conclusions:


    1. I have way too much free time on my hands.

    2. Not many useful conclusions can be drawn from this activity ... except,

    3. If you want to hear what it sounds like to play exceptionally well in tune, in a small combo jazz setting, listen to Lee Morgan's "Candy" album. By the meter, it is so spot on with intonation, it's almost scary. And the recording itself is so perfectly engineered, that Lee's playing is way out front and that's just meter-friendly.

    Turtle
     
  6. hahkeystah

    hahkeystah Piano User

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    i agree with #1. notice i'm on here during the middle of the work day... heh
     
  7. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    My favorite use of this KORG tuner is to have it on all the time while I'm playing along with CDs, the radio and movie soundtracks. You can suss out the key within seconds and get a pretty accurate reference to where the music is at any given moment. I just glance at it, I don't stare at it.

    This works extremely well for anything slow and especially well for simple music structures like folk, pop and blues. It has a more limited value for fast music, especially fast jazz where the meter often looks more like a metronome.

    It's revolutionized my thinking while I'm playing along with all this variety of music. It's like there's a guy shouting out the key to you and the major changes. Now, I don't have to wonder what key we're in and can immediately think about scales to use.

    Turtle
     
  8. rohanwallis

    rohanwallis New Friend

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    One thing that I think is ultimately the most important on intonation is to use your ears. Each situation that you play in is unique and sometimes the other you pay with (including the piano players!!) may not be "in tune". the more you use your ears to tune the better they get!! Aural training and a bit of work with a tuner is important but surely you would agree that an "in tune" trumpet player with a group that may be a bit flat or sharp or both may not be the best thing.
    I also notice that when I listen to and transcribe great players that they are very rarely locked into a tempered scale but tend to be more flexible and expressive through the use of intonation as a compositional tool. I'd be interested to hear what others think about this angle.
    :)
    Rohan


    ps. Bring back A432 I say!!
     
  9. JNINWI

    JNINWI Piano User

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    That Zig Kanstul is a brilliant man, my Kanstul came tuned from the factory…….
     
  10. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    This is usually what I'm doing during my breaks, but also before I acquire music. I may actually sing, hum or whistle the music.
     

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