Intonation Issues

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by ALWilts, Jul 24, 2015.

  1. ALWilts

    ALWilts New Friend

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    richtom, no need to have deleted your post, constructive criticism is paramount for anyone who wants to get better. What exactly did you mean? It would be great if you could expand on what you said.
     
  2. richtom

    richtom Forte User

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    OK. What I said was - and it is apparent to me anyway - your major issue is with your breathing. It is constricted and not flowing through the horn.
    I suggest long tones played from ppp to fff back to ppp. Also, Chicowitz's Flow Studies would prove invaluable.
    Scales would also be of great benefit as they show you the air flow needed to get to the top of the scale and the changes you must incorporate. I don't know where your range stops but I would guess it goes up to the F on the top of the staff. Scales, long tones, flow studies, and other simple exercises address the issues you need to continue on and satisfy your own desire to play.

    Here are some notes on breathing from Adolph Herseth.

    When taking a breath, pronounce the word "ho" yet inhaling at the same time.
    When using this method for practice, put hand on stomach and chest - it should move out on its own due to lungs filling up.
    For getting the feeling of an absolutely open airway and flow, put one end of a toilet paper roll in mouth and inhale - note the equal ease of inhaling and exhaling.
    Breathe from low in the lungs rather than from the chest. If done correctly, the stomach will go out on its own.
    To get a big sound, it is imperative that the air flow (or movement) is greater. The pressure of air flow is not what creates the big sound, it is much the same as violin, which creates a bigger sound when the bow is moved faster across the strings then from pressure on the strings.

    He kept things as simple as possible. His playing was virtually effortless because of his principles.

    Rich T.
     
  3. ALWilts

    ALWilts New Friend

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    Thanks Rich, that's some really useful information. You're right, the top of my 'everyday' useable range is an F (a bit higher for the start but it decreases as I practice). I know what you're getting at - from time to time I can blow and I get a lovely pure tone out of the horn, but the rest of the time it feels more like a struggle, especially as I get more tired. I'll try and be more mindful and work on my air flow. Thanks again!
     
  4. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

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    If you haven't run a cleaning snake though your horn, I would do that in short order. If your doctor okays it, exercise helps...and get your Clarke technical studies book out and pick one a week and tongue the heck out of them.
    Rowuk and Rich are right on imho.
     
  5. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    Too strong a comment I think.

    I'm happy lipping up 1st valve D on the Wild Thing for example, but on my Yamaha, I find I sometimes retain tone better using 1-3. Particularly on slow stuff like hymn tunes, and particularly in the keys where that D is poor - C, G, D spring to mind. Keeps me on the resonant sweet spot. Your experience may differ, but that doesn't make mine lousy.
     
  6. richtom

    richtom Forte User

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    edited out.
     

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