Intonation of the Tiny Notes

Discussion in 'Orchestra / Solo / Chamber Music' started by Sethoflagos, May 13, 2018.

  1. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    You are right, my bad!
    There are some trumpet/ mouthpiece combinations where 123 is more work than with others. Whether they are “problems” or not depends on how diligently that we practice them. Stamp exercizes also help us negotiate bending notes. I do not consider the Clarke exercizes to be a “problem”.
     
  2. BigDub

    BigDub Utimate User

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    The question to me are, can we play so fast that the intonation doesn't matter? Should we just aim for the sweet spot and let her rip?

    For me, the answer is yes.[/QUOTE]
    In response to the last portion, I would say, for me, when listening to passages of music, out of tune playing weighs heavily on me and I immediately know something is off. When the intonation is true I have a very good relaxed reaction and feel free to enjoy the making of good music instead.
     
  3. LaTrompeta

    LaTrompeta Forte User

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    In response to the last portion, I would say, for me, when listening to passages of music, out of tune playing weighs heavily on me and I immediately know something is off. When the intonation is true I have a very good relaxed reaction and feel free to enjoy the making of good music instead.[/QUOTE]

    Oh boy, you would not like Balinese Gamelan haha!
     
  4. J. Jericho

    J. Jericho Fortissimo User

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    Just a few theoretical/esoteric questions:

    My electronic air conditioning leak detector emits a steady click when no hydrocarbons are detected. When a few are picked up, the frequency increases, and when even more molecules set the detector off, it emits a coarse tone which increases in pitch, relative to the increased frequency.

    If you could tongue fast enough, could you play DHC by rapidly tonguing middle G? Would you not have to tongue as fast to achieve the same result starting on a higher note?

    Wouldn't any pitch you play increase with the frequency of tonguing?
     
  5. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    ...to say nothing of hypothetical :-)....

    First some groundwork.

    If I push free fluttertonguing to its limit, I start to feel a distinct low bass note coming through, at which point we might call it a tongue buzz. I guess, if we could shunt this up a few octaves into the range where it could be supported by the trumpet air column, we'd no longer be playing a lip-reed, but a tongue-reed.

    Combine the two and we have multiphonic playing, the theory of which is pretty well established.

    We'd be combining both the lip note and the tongue note which, if they are to be strong, must lie on the same harmonic series so that they can both be supported and synchronised by a stable, resonant air column.

    As a bonus, we should get some pretty impressive sum-and-difference tones also emerging from the system.

    So....

    High B or DHD would be easier as they would be supported by the harmonic series of middle G. Options of producing them either as tongued or resultant tone.

    Not how it works....erm... I mean, would work if we had these Marvel comic superpowers that at least obeyed a convenient subset of the laws of physics.

    Ditto (I think). You'd be playing distinct chords, not morphing two notes into a single composite pitch.
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2018
    J. Jericho likes this.
  6. J. Jericho

    J. Jericho Fortissimo User

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    Great answers! Thank you!
     

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