intonation???

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by robbie, Oct 10, 2005.

  1. tpter1

    tpter1 Forte User

    Age:
    53
    2,259
    11
    Jan 12, 2005
    Northern New York
    So it sounds like this piano player is really bullying you about your playing up there. Could this be causing tension? (Physical)? Have you noticed this problem before playing with this group? Do you feel yourself thinking about it before you go up in that range and then worrying after you've played?

    I am with all of the above about not using the tuner. When I work on my intonation, I use the tuner function on my Dr. Beat, and listen for resultant tones at various intervals (both on my BERP and on the horn). It's kind of cool...Try Schlossberg #4 as a series of 4-3 suspensions or Major to minor 3rds or P5 to tritones!
     
  2. dcstep

    dcstep Mezzo Piano User

    684
    3
    Nov 27, 2003
    Denver
    As so many have said, "Hear it first."

    Maybe practicing some very simple melodies up there will help you hear the intervals and play better in tune. On that pop stuff you tend to just hit stingers up there or short little ryhthm phrases. Playing a slower melody up there will train your lips to the tuning required. For example, play Mary Had a Little Lamb in a "guitar key" up there. Playing E-concert (F# on your Bb trumpet) tends so sharpen you up anyway, so it can really aggravate the situation.

    I wonder if that backbore might be a little too tight for you. You may have overcompensated for the free blowing horn a little too much on your backbore. Have you tried one step off in tightness?

    Dave
     
  3. Mzony

    Mzony Pianissimo User

    75
    0
    Nov 14, 2004
    Honolulu, Hawaii
    I buy tuners that sound pitches (like a drone) back at the player. This way, I can practice playing scales slowly (and softly) making each note lock into place.
    Instead of trying to line a needle up to a zero, try concentrating on the drone and see where each note of the scale belongs. This is something that seems to work very well for me.

    Mike
     
  4. dcstep

    dcstep Mezzo Piano User

    684
    3
    Nov 27, 2003
    Denver
    Mike, does this really work when you get into keys with lots of sharps and flats? I've always thought that tuners were great for giving you a reference tuning note, like A-440hz, but that they couldn't adjust for the intervals you'll encounter in playing "real" music. Playing pop and rock in a wedding band you'll be playing in F# on a Bb trumpet a lot and your D# against the keyboard's B is going to require some adjustment that the tuner won't necessarily help with. That's why I like to work on the ear part. Remember, the original question had to do with playing in the upper register and tuning to a keyboard.

    However, I certainly don't know everything and maybe I'm missing something.

    With best regards,

    Dave
     
  5. cornetguy

    cornetguy Mezzo Forte User

    797
    4
    Sep 12, 2005
    Saint Paul, MN
    Agree with on on that Manny. When use Stamp, I do exactly that.

    I POUND pitches out on the piano with beginning brass players when have them buzzing to try to get them to match pitch. Sometimes it seems like a loosing proposition, but I know it will pay off down the road, even if I dont get to see the benifits, their HS director will thank me. (my ideal level for teaching band is beginners)
     
  6. Tootsall

    Tootsall Fortissimo User

    4,529
    8
    Oct 25, 2003
    Yee HAW!
    I cannot sing a high C!
     
  7. dcstep

    dcstep Mezzo Piano User

    684
    3
    Nov 27, 2003
    Denver
    Yes, that is no small problem. That's why I say you have to "hear" it. Actually playing simple melodies up in that range helps you to hear the intervals in tunes. Since you can use almost any valve combination up there it's very important that you're shooting for the right sound with your lips, since the valves aren't that much help.

    Another thought, the D just over high-C is usually considerably flat when played with 1st valve on most trumpets. If I lip up to it using open valves while warming up it's better in tune. Funny thing is, The PitPops usually open with Everybody Needs Somebody To Love which has repeated Ds, which I play with the first valve, IN TUNE. It's in tune because I hear what I'm shooting for and it doesn't really matter which valve I put down, since my lips and air are aiming at the right note in the context of the band and the song. (Adrenalin helps to on the first song).

    Dave
     
  8. Mzony

    Mzony Pianissimo User

    75
    0
    Nov 14, 2004
    Honolulu, Hawaii
    Hi Dave,
    Yes, there are tuners with chromatic drones over 5 octaves. I own two of them. Sabine makes something they call a metrotune MT9000. That not only has 5 octaves of chromatic drones, but has a metronome and a tuner on it. It fits great in my case and I feel it is very useful.
    Also, along the same lines, if you can find a practice buddy (regardless of what instrument he/she plays) spend a half hour a couple of times a week with him/her. Have your buddy play a long tone and you play a scale or an arpeggio slowly over the drone, and then switch. This is very useful in terms of learning how to play with other timberes.
    Try it. Let me know.

    Mike
     
  9. dcstep

    dcstep Mezzo Piano User

    684
    3
    Nov 27, 2003
    Denver
    Ok, I think I get it Mike. For instance, if I'm going to practice in the key of F# I set the drone at F#, then play everything in tune with that (assuming the key-center doesn't change). Is that the correct usage, as you suggest?

    Dave
     
  10. Derek Reaban

    Derek Reaban Mezzo Piano User

    609
    1
    Jun 16, 2005
    Tempe, Arizona
    Dave,

    Sing it with the drone too! You can do this away from the horn and work on intonation without any fatigue. This will double the exposure time to great (elegant) intonation for half of the effort. It will transfer quicker to your playing too.
     

Share This Page