Intonation

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by J. Jericho, Sep 12, 2014.

  1. J. Jericho

    J. Jericho Fortissimo User

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    A horn that plays in tune is a pleasure because it takes less work to adjust to its idiosyncrasies and characteristics, resulting in less fatigue and concentration on the shortcomings of a particular instrument, thus enabling one to concentrate on making music instead. In your experience, what horns have you found to be particularly free from intonation problems?
     
  2. strad116055

    strad116055 Pianissimo User

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    i think schilkes and monettes have the reputation of being well in tune. the question always remains: "in tune with who?"
     
  3. Tjnaples

    Tjnaples Piano User

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    I'm buying a Monette, when I was at the factory deciding on a model for two days last August this wasn't even a thought. The mouthpiece and tuning slide just for starters alone go 90% towards the answer, it's physics. Playing loud or soft on it doesn't matter because the horn doesn't automatically go sharp/flat. I'm spoiled and anxious, but also having a good ear for what's in tune, and adjusting on the fly never goes out of style. iTabla helps me know. That's being a good musician, how hard you want to always have to work at it is up to the individual. Horns definitely vary.

    TJ
     
  4. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    What can you expect of a trumpet other than that its octaves and fifths line up?

    Everything else varies with key. A good Ab in one key is a horribly sharp G# in another.

    Even if your Cs and Gs are all perfect fifths and octaves, that's great for C and a few other keys. But play something in say Bb, and if your C is good, all your Gs will be noticeably sharp. There's no mechanical way around this, it's a fundamental part of how harmonics work. Beyond that, all there is to discuss is what's the best compromise.

    There are differences. With the sort of mouthpiece I prefer, I find I can lip the Wild Thing in pretty well, but prefer to work the valve slides on the Yamaha. Whose to say which is best? I regard both as having 'good intonation' but the compromise is different. If I look for anything, it's that none of the slides are too long.

    Frankly, any manufacturer who claims his trumpets have 'perfect intonation' is (IMNSHO) talking from whence the sun doth not shine.
     
    Vulgano Brother likes this.
  5. Tjnaples

    Tjnaples Piano User

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    Monette mouthpieces 101...Monette mouthpiece explanation and demonstration - YouTube.

    Next look at the Monette tuning slide, it is the same shape as an airplane wing...FOR A REASON. Other parts of the horn I can't speak for. There's a reason a lot of today's BEST play a Monette. Not dealing with this crap? One of them, I take lessons from Adam Rapa (it's come up).

    Dave's mouthpieces are a HUGE step forward (again watch the video) in this, his horns go above and beyond what's covered here. If Seth has had my identical experience he wouldn't be saying this. Sincerely sharing a great experience first hand (foot stomp)...TJ
     
  6. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    My posting wasn't in response to yours, TJ. African internet connections work on entirely different timescale to what you're familiar with. But had I read your post first, please be assured that my understanding of the mathematical basis of harmony would not have changed one jot.

    I'm happy you are enjoying your Monette experience and wish you everlasting enjoyment with it. The news that you test its tuning against an electronic device is more than sufficient to leave me convinced. ;-)
     
  7. Tjnaples

    Tjnaples Piano User

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    Hi Seth,

    Roger that even being almost 20 minutes after mine, I believe you...mahalo. I'm a trumpet player/physics fanatic so when I began understanding Dave's approach was more scientific than company motto I was interested. Follow that with no kidding trumpet player experience wow. Adam introduced me to iTabla and I swear by it now too. Instead of using a tuner have the tone in your mind/head (even if by headphones), play the tone and match it. Nothing will EVER replace the human and musician portion of playing.

    Here is Adam playing the National Anthem at the last game at Cowboys Stadium. He awesomely and quickly adjusts even his slide on the go towards the beginning: National Anthem With Full Intro and Outro - Adam Rapa - Final Game at Cowboys Stadium - YouTube

    I'd like to draw attention to the high F, the vibrato and tone on that note are unmatched. He's on a Monette P3S, and B3F S7 Monette mouthpiece.

    And if you've never heard of Adam Rapa before he's all over YouTube and it's a special treat to watch him perform in BLAST!
     
  8. Rapier

    Rapier Forte User

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    Well if we are talking understanding the technical side of instrument making, I'd suggest Smith-Watkins might know a thing or two. ;-)
     
  9. Tjnaples

    Tjnaples Piano User

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    Great, please provide the link(s), education is always a plus! What the hell's with the squarely freakin' smiles? lol
     
  10. Tjnaples

    Tjnaples Piano User

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    Listen, we're all on the same team here, I've just found a fantastic team and want to help. No one person has all the best ideas, however lets give those particular folks with some of the best R&D the respect they deserve man.
     

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