Is Air Everything???

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by JHarris, Jul 16, 2004.

  1. W Scott

    W Scott Piano User

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    Dec 8, 2003
    Carson City, NV.
    The point of the exercise is NOT about weight or about how many phone books you can press.

    You will probably need a couple of phone books so that you can see them and know that you are keeping your diaphragm expanded and breathing right. When you expand your lungs using your diaphragm, the phone books will go up because your stomach will expand. The trick is to keep them up there when you are playing. When you can do that, you're breathing from your diaphragm which is what you want as a trumpet player.

    Again, it's not about weight, the phone books are a visual aid to show you how to breathe.


    Bill
     
  2. Veldkamp

    Veldkamp Piano User

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    Mar 29, 2004
    the Netherlands
    That's what I meant by breathing in your daily life. I always breath in to my lower stomach, so trumpetplaying isn't that much of a change for me if you talk about air and air support.

    Like spitting out a hair on my tongue for staccato, if you keep it simple it's easier to learn (and more fun).
     
  3. JHarris

    JHarris New Friend

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    Jul 13, 2004
    Ok I got got the drill. I guess I was Miss interpreting it. I thought of it as a drill not a visulizer. I thought it was to make breathing harder so you have a more powerful breathing tecnique. Sorry, but thanks.
     
  4. W Scott

    W Scott Piano User

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    Dec 8, 2003
    Carson City, NV.
    Well, it's sort of a drill using a visual aid to show you how to breath right.

    Actually there are two components to this exercise:

    1. Relaxing your stomach muscles and breathing deep so the phone book will go up. The reason for doing this is that it increases the functional reserve capacity, which in simple terms means that it gives you the maximum amount of air to use.

    2. Then, learning to keep those stomach muscles extended and TIGHT (by keeping the phone book up) is the second part. We use the tension of our stomach muscles to control the speed (or force) of the air we use to play the horn.

    BTW--open the phone book up to the middle and drape it over your stomach. Trying to balance a closed phone book isn't necessary.

    Bill
     
  5. dbacon

    dbacon Mezzo Piano User

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    Oct 24, 2003
    Scottsdale, AZ.
    Isometric tension is the last thing (and the worst thing) you want for your musculature. Muscle against muscle will not produce wind (air motion), just static air (air not in motion). You want un-opposed support from the blowing muscles with out the inhale muscles fighting back during exhalation. Get up off the floor and practice exercises to develop a sense of motion, the bellows effect with the lungs. Get Sam Pilafians Breathing Gym. Go for the creation of freely blown air, not isometric tension. Tension is the sound killer!
     
  6. dizforprez

    dizforprez Forte User

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    Nov 2, 2003
    I wouldnt do this.
     
  7. W Scott

    W Scott Piano User

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    Dec 8, 2003
    Carson City, NV.
    Dave, if you're not breathing with you're diaphragm, you're not going to sound good.

    I'm NOT saying to continue to use isometric tension. I am saying that a trumpet player is going to have to learn to use his stomach muscles both to inhale and then to contract to control the air. The exercise I've told about here works for learning to breathe with the diaphragm. I'm a Respiratory Therapist and I've taught it to dozens of folks with chronic lung problems so that they can increase the amount of useable air that they have.

    This exercise is a starting place, not the end.........
     
  8. W Scott

    W Scott Piano User

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    Dec 8, 2003
    Carson City, NV.
    BTW, Dave, do you have a source for the book you mentioned?

    Thanks,
    Bill
     
  9. dbacon

    dbacon Mezzo Piano User

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    Oct 24, 2003
    Scottsdale, AZ.
    Dave, if you're not breathing with you're diaphragm, you're not going to sound good.
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    The diaphragm is an involuntary muscle, and it's the only way we inhale (yes, I know about the strap muscle and connective tissues between the ribs, but the diaphragm is the principle muscle of inspiration). It's passive during exhalation. If active, it contracts and pushes down against the exhalation muscles.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    I'm NOT saying to continue to use isometric tension.
    I am saying that a trumpet player is going to have to learn to use his stomach muscles both to inhale and then to contract to control the air. The exercise I've told about here works for learning to breathe with the diaphragm. I'm a Respiratory Therapist and I've taught it to dozens of folks with chronic lung problems so that they can increase the amount of useable air that they have.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The tight gut will produce isometric tension. That action is for child birth, defecation, grunting, pushing hard against something. It's known as the Valsalva Maneuver. This is a pelvic pressure syndrome that uses the musculature to bear down, increasing internal air pressure and causing the throat to close to contain the pressure. Inside the body the air is under great pressure but creates no motion as the system is locked up. Excess contraction of the abdomen's musculature is unnecessary as it limits the potential of the respiratory system.

    We breathe by first taking air into the lungs (inspiration) and then expelling it (expiration). This makes up a complete breath. Exhalation begins with the relaxation of the inspiratory muscles. With forced exhalation the relaxed diaphram is lifted by the abdominal muscles. This acts as a lifting feeling, not tightness. Many people make the mistake of assuming that muscle contraction is what gives you "support." The blowing of the breath is the support, not tension in the muscles, but the movement of air that is required by the embouchure in coming to a given size and shape for a particular note.

    Use the bellows effect in the respiratory system. Muscle against muscle works against this effect.
     
  10. JHarris

    JHarris New Friend

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    Jul 13, 2004
    You guys did your research!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
     

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