Is Doubletongue Key to achieving Crisp Singletongue?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Sethoflagos, Sep 4, 2014.

  1. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    It comes down to air usage. In a nutshell, part of the process of attack is proper air usage, and I've always felt that it was a key component of successful double tonguing. I made a correlation years ago with my playing that when I was doing a lot of articulation work that my chops got stronger, my sound improved, my articulation all around got cleaner, and my endurance got better.

    Some will argue that it's all about relaxation, and to a point they are correct - if you are playing with too much tension then you are going to have issues using your air correctly, but for me the bottom line is that there is a correlation between good air usage and clean articulation - it's a symbiotic relationship.
     
  2. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    It is also about air usage which is why when circular breathing, the tongue is very relaxed. It has to be to stay out of the way.
     
  3. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Not to derail the thread or stir up the pot, but is there really any practical need for the ability to circular breathe? I've seen it done and know people who can do it, but unless you are Kenny G going for the longest note record, or doing some other kind of exhibition, is it even necessary?
     
  4. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Circular breathing is just another technique in phrasing. There are certain phrases I love to play that without a breath, just glide so smoothly.

    I use it periodically at the end of ballads, holding on a 4th, 9th or 13th of a chord while the sax player glides very tasty improve lines around the held note.

    It provides more tonal control in holding notes over several (sometimes many) bars than if just taking one big breath.

    Physiologically, it provides PEEP (Positive End Expiratory Pressure) and opens up distal airways (recruits lung volume) that will hold open for the bulk of the night. So it enhances my vital capacity, I use more air and work less harder as a result. As I posted in my thread "Thoughts from a Hospital Bed" I did this while on a pulse oxyimeter, and increased my oxygen saturation by 6%.

    Then there is the show boat use... At least one blues tune a night at a gig, I will hold one blues note through two entire 12 bar blues repeats, building steadily in volume, and then in the third round, explode into bebop runs that challenge the friction coefficient of my valve oil. The contrast is stunning. I get major large applause when I do this. Predictably. Every time.
     
  5. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Who knew that the key to vitality and applause is circular breathing? :dontknow: I learn something new every day. Shucks, I thought that the key to getting great applause was killing it on the vocals of "Mack the Knife." (Seriously, during the dinner sets when all other tunes are getting crickets, I'll bring the house down with "Mack the Knife.")
     
  6. Ed Kennedy

    Ed Kennedy Forte User

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    Oh yeah.
     
  7. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Likely from cutting use of the tongue. Post audio (perhaps with video as well). I would love to hear it.
     
  8. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    pwwwooofffff is more of a relaxation technique for the lip (it is used instead of buzzing). But if you have relaxed lips, it would follow that the tongue should also be relaxed... as they are in harmony... together... a Zen kind of State of being.
     
  9. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    the crispness of single tonguing is more based on concept of articulation than anything that we can intellectualize.

    Tonguing is the consonants of trumpeting. I find that playing easy tunes with a message, like from a hymnbook helps me to learn to hear the difference between razor sharp, heavy hammered, flame thrower, cloud, thick oil, dry martini.

    We need a relaxed body, solid breathing and hundred to thousands of repetitions - just like when learning to talk. Listen to children at various stages of development speak - optimally with various languages - spanish, german, russian all have different grades of hardness and kids demonstrate the paths there.

    To practice articulation, play tunes!
     
  10. Cornyandy

    Cornyandy Fortissimo User

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    I think that is something we sometimes forget that the aim is to play tunes.
     

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