is it a bad idea to use different mouthpieces for different genres?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by hhsTrumpet, Jan 19, 2012.

  1. hhsTrumpet

    hhsTrumpet Piano User

    297
    41
    Dec 3, 2011
    California
    Would using more than one mouthpiece for different purposes screw up my playing?
     
  2. codyb226

    codyb226 Banned

    2,660
    353
    Mar 9, 2011
    Florida, US
    No, I use a 3C and a 14a4a. Doenst mess me up unless I dont look at what one I put in the horn. Use what you like. But I would say to find a happy medium mouthpiece that works for all of your playing. Or find one with the same rim. Sometimes it is great, others dont work out to well. I am borrowing a 3E from a friend, same rim as my 3C but a lot shallower. I dont like it at all, I like my 14a4a better even though it has a different rim.
     
  3. bumblebee

    bumblebee Fortissimo User

    3,780
    1,655
    Jan 21, 2010
    Great Southern Land
    I suggest you don't play too many, but when you've worked out which 2 or 3 you want to use you will have to practice longer overall (i.e. don't spend much less time practicing with mouthpiece A because you've now got mouthpiece B too). I personally have 3, all have the same rim (more or less) but 2 different depths and one has a wider throat.

    I am guilty of not practicing on the shallowest mouthpiece as much as I do the other two.

    --bumblebee
     
  4. DaTrump

    DaTrump Forte User

    1,963
    608
    Oct 21, 2011
    Huntsville, Texas
    Exactly. You need to be able to make the switch without ruining all your work your other mouthpieces. Keep similar rims, it makes it easier. Do you have certain ones in mind, or do you already have them?
     
  5. hhsTrumpet

    hhsTrumpet Piano User

    297
    41
    Dec 3, 2011
    California
    Already have them. Shown on my signature.
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    60
    16,011
    6,861
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    I think that switching mouthpieces becomes interesting after a certain amount of musical maturity. Only if you "understand" what needs to be happening does it work. I think one of the WORST situations is when the player does not have the "support" for a particular type of playing. Inadequate breathing makes using a shallow mouthpiece sound like playing a cheap toy, inadequate breathing with a larger mouthpiece sounds dull.

    We switch for sound which CAN make fulfilling a concept easier. A lead mouthpiece needs lead breathing and attitude. The additional sizzle possible with a lead mouthpiece can change the jazz band experience. The breadth and depth of sound with a properly supported bigger mouthpiece can make the symphonic/wind band experience better. It ISN'T the mouthpiece. It is the concept in the head of the player.

    I personally have no school students that switch (except for the picc). The ones playing lead pretty much have little interest in symphony, so we work on developing THEIR interests.
     
  7. BrassEye

    BrassEye Pianissimo User

    88
    22
    Sep 9, 2011
    It won't screw up your playing if done sensibly; look at the number of pieces Roger Ingram uses. However, he is a very experienced player with well developed technique in every aspect of his playing.
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2013
  8. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

    17,895
    8,998
    Jan 28, 2011
    Dayton, Ohio
    If the mouthpiece is comfortable to you, how could it screw up the performance? Yes, different pieces can change your sound, but not your skill. If you like a particular sound that piece provides on that song... Then you are being an artist, just as if you were painting and decide to use this brush for this stroke and that brush for another to provide a texture you desire. That my friend is being an artist, and that is what music performance is all about from my perspective. You should be painting your masterpiece with your desire for the audience to appreciate as you present it.
     
  9. Kujo20

    Kujo20 Forte User

    1,588
    634
    Sep 29, 2010
    Gmonady is right on with his post.
    "Yes, different pieces can change your sound, but not your skill. If you like a particular sound that piece provides on that song... Then you are being an artist, just as if you were painting and decide to use this brush for this stroke and that brush for another to provide a texture you desire."

    It's a universal thing. You wear sneakers for running, steel toe boots for work, dress shoes for weddings and concerts....etc...etc... The same can go for mouthpieces.

    I think another aspect of switching mouthpieces is how well you acclimate to them. Some people really can't deal with a few thousands of an inch difference...

    Kujo
     
  10. the newbie

    the newbie Pianissimo User

    161
    25
    Jan 27, 2011
    San Francisco
    My 3b sounds the best all round but when my lips get tired or i need to play higher notes i can switch to my 11c, its no where near as full sounding but i can grasp and hold higher notes better.

    But i concentrate practising on the 3b most. ( I wanted a 3c but local shop had none the day i traded my shilke 14a4a which was way to shallow for me.)
     

Share This Page