Is it bad to skip a day of practice?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by isuckattrumpet, Mar 17, 2014.

  1. isuckattrumpet

    isuckattrumpet Pianissimo User

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    I didn't touch my trumpet at all today, and I haven't missed a day of practice in a couple months... I thought it would be OK to skip today because I just concluded a series of two hour shows, every day for the past 5 days. I was just feeling a bit guilty about it because I remembered what my middle school band director always said -- everyday you miss a day of practice, you go backwards in your development. Just wondering if any pro's take a day off? I think I read somewhere that some people take one day off every week?

    Thanks
     
  2. Kujo20

    Kujo20 Forte User

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    I remember watching a video interview of James Morrison where he states that he doesn't practice. He doesn't like to, so he doesn't. He just plays.

    Then again that's James Morrison... If you consider yourself a trumpet student, you should practice as often as convenient. But I wouldn't stress too much about missing one day. Relax!

    Kujo
     
  3. barliman2001

    barliman2001 Fortissimo User

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    Don't worry about missing a day or even two. Sometimes, both lips and brains need a rest. But if you rest consciously, don't feel guilty.
     
  4. Peter McNeill

    Peter McNeill Utimate User

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    What James Morrison does not say, is that he plays everyday. I used to see him in his early days at Soup Plus in Sydney (1980s), and he played hard, as well as rehearsing all his songs live before cutting a track. He is a serious muso, and although he says he does not practice, I would suggest he plays every day to get his routines working - he just does not call it practice - as he plays rather than practice.

    There is a saying here on TM, one day off - only you will know, 2 off and those around you will know, 3 days off and the audience knows.

    1 day off - go enjoy yourself, and hit it hard tomorrow.
     
  5. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    I find it important that you take a day off by choice and not by laziness.
     
  6. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    Just as long as it doesn't become 2, enjoy!
     
  7. mgcoleman

    mgcoleman Mezzo Forte User

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    In those instances where I need a break (chops worn out, etc.) and my schedule allows, I will do 20-25 minutes playing low and soft long tones with slight dynamic changes, almost like as if it was meditation.

    There are some days once in awhile when missing practice can't be avoided, but the advice of keeping it to just one day has always seemed true for me.
     
  8. jiarby

    jiarby Fortissimo User

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    Since my comeback almost 3yrs ago now I have never taken a day off... i figured that I had 19yrs of "days off" all in a row so I didn't need any more. One of the things about my past I wanted to correct was the inconsistency of practice. I never practiced in school (not consistently anyway) and frequently took days/weeks/months off. Consequently I was always in a rebuilding mode, rarely "in shape" and it eventually was a contributing factor in why I quit.

    Now, however, after 2 yrs 10 months and 20 days since starting I think that rest is an important component of a rebuilding program. Playing on torn up chops is not usually constructive and actually just delays your improvement. For me, a "rest day" means a shorter day of long tones, light flexibilities and some lyrical etudes spread throughout the day. My average face time is 3-5 hrs, and a light day is 1.5-2. I would seriously hate to take a REAL day off now and ruin my comeback practice record... but that is just my own psychological problem.
     
  9. Dr.Mark

    Dr.Mark Mezzo Forte User

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    never mind
     
  10. Branson

    Branson Piano User

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    A lot depends on your age, ability and playing requirements.

    For an up and coming player, every day helps you develop.

    For an older more experienced player, a day off will generally help.

    It really depends on what works best for the individual.

    If you feel guilty for taking a day off, don't take a day off.

    Resting one day will never ruin any player and in most cases it will help.
     

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