Is it impossible for some people to develop good tone?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Trumpeter3197, Aug 8, 2013.

  1. veery715

    veery715 Utimate User

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    Try the 19/30 exercise: 19/30s exercise explained - View topic: Trumpet Herald forum

    It will help you develop a relaxed open sound. I wonder if you are pinching your lips together. You do not need to do this to get the horn to speak. Your lips need to be close or together, but not PINCHED as this will constrain your sound.

    Lastly, hook up with Jeanne Pocius: [email protected] and let her give you a Skype lessson. I would bet real money she can help you, and I will even offer to pay for half your lesson if you do it and tell her I sent you so I can pay her.
     
  2. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    On a general note, is it normal practice these days to encourage young players to use screamers routinely?
     
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  3. Cornyandy

    Cornyandy Fortissimo User

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    Hi Seth,

    I'm not sure what goes on stateside but quite often on here we get posts like "Lips Mashed after Marching Band" or "Tone Gone After Band Camp" The culture of playing (in my opinion) too loud and too high for youngsters is alive and well and detrimental to many youthfull players but then as an English Brass Band (ex York RI) type who loves both trumpet and cornet and hates screaming what do I know.

    Andrew
     
  4. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    Small world, Andy

    I sat in on 3rd desk at York RI while I was in shorts and Graham Walker was lead (long time ago).

    I agree with you wholeheartedly, but what would I know!
     
  5. barliman2001

    barliman2001 Fortissimo User

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    If you want me to, I can look for them...
     
  6. JNINWI

    JNINWI Piano User

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    If you simply do it mathematically there is no safari.......
     
  7. Cornyandy

    Cornyandy Fortissimo User

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    But It's never as simple as pure maths, this is art.
     
  8. JNINWI

    JNINWI Piano User

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    Playing trumpet IS art, I agree. Intelligently choosing a mouthpiece is not art, it’s a matter of mathematics, plain and simple. If you know what roll each part of the mouthpiece plays in your sound / style, and know how changing the dimension larger or smaller of that part effects your sound, then your 95% there in finding a piece that will be very close to what you need for your application. Finding out what roll each part of the mouthpiece plays is very easy to find on line, and mouthpiece manufactures list mouthpiece dimensions by style, making it easy to make a choice. If you don’t do your homework, then yes it is a safari, and an expensive one at that.
     
  9. Masterwannabe

    Masterwannabe Mezzo Piano User

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    I think this sort of addresses a point that I have not really seen brought up yet. Musicality, if someone is just concentrating on the technical aspects of playing the trumpet and not putting adequate attention to the MUSIC, something has been missed or left out. For those of you who are blessed with the talent to compose I am sure you would agree that the music you create sort of tells a story. You were inspired by something and if someone just played the notes with no FEEL of the music the inspiration/story is lost. We see this not only in reading and probably most every other form of communication, like TEXTING. I have heard someone say you can't play the blues if you haven't lived them, I think all music is sort of like this and age & experience will have an effect on results.

    I am off my soapbox now, I played with a Parduba *5* double cup for years but the 1st trumpet in our big band convinced me to change to a Curry 7C deep cup. I love it and my range has not suffered at all (there was an adjustment period) and I am now constantly getting compliments on my tone. Technically I am nowhere near what I had in high school but as a musician I think I am far better. One big thing is affording myself the pleasure of feeling the music.
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2013
  10. gzent

    gzent Fortissimo User

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    I agree with the mention of what the tongue is doing. Furthermore, the shape of the oral cavity can really radically create different tone qualities.
    Dropping the jaw and forcing the tongue downward can really create an excessively dull tone. And using extreme pucker can play a part too.

    To me the people that mentioned pinky ring and finger placement on the valves are obsessed with pressure.
    I'd find a teacher that understands the effects of the oral cavity and ask for their help.

    Just some ideas...
     

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