Is it impossible for some people to develop good tone?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Trumpeter3197, Aug 8, 2013.

  1. JNINWI

    JNINWI Piano User

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    I agree TJ, while you MAY be able to get a beat up student bundy to sound good, (Not), your sound is highly influenced by your gear set up. I change my set up based on what
    and where I'mn playing. I do it with different sized mouthpieces.... ie, my Lead piece will never go in my horn in a church...
     
  2. Churchman

    Churchman Mezzo Piano User

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    And... all this good advice aside...

    play with your heart, not your head.
     
  3. gzent

    gzent Fortissimo User

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    Nothing wrong with long tones, just like there's nothing wrong with walking to work.

    However, if you live 10 miles from work, you might want to try a car, bus, etc.

    My point, sure long tones can make you play better. But if you know why, you can achieve the same effect with
    better breathing, embouchure and so on.
     
  4. Branson

    Branson Piano User

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  5. gzent

    gzent Fortissimo User

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    No hardware will give a player with bad tone good tone.

    Hardware is to trumpet playing as detailing is to cars.

    If you have a Camry, taking it to the best detailer in LA will make it clean and shiny, but it won't make it a BMW.

    On the other hand, if you have a dirty BMW, detailing it will make it look better.

    In the end, the Camry is still a Camry and the BMW is still a BMW.

    Same with trumpet gear, in the end the guy with lousy tone still has lousy tone, even though it may be
    produced on "better" hardware.
     
  6. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    There's nothing wrong with "painting by the number"... just don't know many people who buys that kind of art.
     
  7. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    The luckiest students have teachers that work with their students to develop their own fabulous tones.
     
  8. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    You have to do a lot of playing to discover what a fabulous tone is... Playing is putting listening into action. That takes much more time... more time than just the listening.
     
  9. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Long tones is the beginning of the road to development of tone... long tones work toward preparing for what lies ahead.


    I love Broccoli... especially burnt... I love long tones as well, and I cook them up each and every time I play... But I use them wisely... Just as Alan Vizzutti advises... His philosophy on long tones is the most accurate of all advice I have ever heard on long tones, and I am a Vizzutti long tone disciple. If you ever get a chance to attend one of his Master Classes... please make every effort to attend. You will see what long tones can (and cannot) do for you.
     
  10. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Gary,

    That's 4 posts in row! :huh: (no wonder your post count is so high)

    Yes, I get what you're saying ...... Bear in mind that I'm still in my first year. Nobody, not even Coltrane, sounded like himself, or anything much, in his first year of playing, and likely he was copying what he heard as well, and, like me, getting his fingerings down, learning to read music, etc. There's plenty of time to find one's voice. You seem to think there's no value in copying .... on that point we disagree.

    I'm well aware of what value it is to have your own sound, and your own style ... just listen to my guitar work. It's completely unique. I've been there. I didn't mean to imply that my teacher tells me to copy this or that ... it's just natural at this stage. I'm still finding out what I like, what the horn is capable of, and how tone can be pushed around with technique, and one of the best ways to explore is to try and mimic what you hear.

    Patience, my friend .... what's the rush to individuality??? Goodness.

    So, just to be accurate, I asked my teacher specifically about long tones at my lesson today. He said that the various teachers he's had over the years have been completely divided on whether or not one should do long tones, some say yes, some say no, and the whole sax world appears to be equally divided. Sounds like it can be good for you if you have an interest in doing long tones, and maybe not at all necessary if you don't. :dontknow:


    Turtle
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2013

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