Is it possible to get to a level of playing to the point where your chops never tire?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Ablstem, Apr 18, 2014.

  1. Ablstem

    Ablstem New Friend

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    I just had a curious thought and I'm well...curious
    Can you be at such a high level of playing that your chops never tire or tire at least after like 5-6 hours of playing? Does Wayne B. Or Arturo S. Ever get tired? :p
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Re: Is it possible to get to a level of playing to the point where your chops never t

    No it is not possible. The muscles used for playing are like any other muscles and have a finite ability to perform. Yes, even the top pros get tired - you may never notice it however because they are intelligent enough to back off before they crash and burn.

    Many less mature players could double their playing time by getting smart. They prefer to not listen to their bodies, the conductor and section mates instead. There is even a thread here about how "my section mates hate me", I mean to even post a thread like that shows a certain amount of "density".

    The secret is to, of course have the best preparation, then to intelligently apply what our bodies and ears are telling us.
     
  3. Phil986

    Phil986 Forte User

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    Re: Is it possible to get to a level of playing to the point where your chops never t

    There is no such thing as a free lunch, or a fatigue free set of chops. A lot of what we perceive as better endurance is in fact due to being more efficient and not expanding (wasting) as much energy when playing. Great players are very efficient players, that's the true source of their endurance. Nonetheless, everyone has limits.
     
  4. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Re: Is it possible to get to a level of playing to the point where your chops never t

    With intelligent practice both endurance and recovery time can improve. Those measures of rest can provide enough recovery time to avoid exhaustion.
     
  5. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    Re: Is it possible to get to a level of playing to the point where your chops never t

    If you need to cover 10 miles on foot, how do you do it? Sprint or walk at a steady pace?

    It's the same with the trumpet. If you kick off a rehearsal by blarting out a string of high Es to impress the droogs, then you'll crash and burn quickly. But if you know your limitations and not go beyond 80% of that, you can keep going all day.

    Arturo etc? Their 80% is just so much higher than our 100%.
     
  6. Dr.Mark

    Dr.Mark Mezzo Forte User

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    Re: Is it possible to get to a level of playing to the point where your chops never t

    Hi Ablstem,
    You sakes:
    "Can you be at such a high level of playing that your chops never tire or tire at least after like 5-6 hours of playing?"
    ----
    It depends on your definition of tired. Please note that there's a profound difference between healthy tired and physical damage. With that said, Mendez would play all day long. Marsalis suggests that 3 hours are required for a good sound practice routine. How do they do this? It's all about conservation and proper mechanics.
    Rowuk is at least 98% correct when he said "it is not possible" because most do not have the fundimental features of conservation & proper mechanics under their belts.
    Most trumpet players are not efficient. They might be effective but not efficient. What's meant by efficient? Using the least amount of resources (energy) to get the job done.
    Unfortunately,once you get to 3,4, or more hours of playing a day, it's hard to do without the horn. Your day (even while at work or school) is clouded with ideas and thoughts about music and the trumpet. Heck I'm typing this right now and thinking about how I'm going to approach (tongue) a particular bluegrass piece I want to have up and running in a couple of weeks.
    Actually, the level you're talking about is more like an addiction....
    Hope this helps
    Dr.Mark
     
  7. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    Re: Is it possible to get to a level of playing to the point where your chops never t

    Wow - I'm tired just reading this -- I've cut back this last year or two from 3 hr practice to half of that ---- my face/jaw feel better on shorter practices, but my endurance seems to correspond and is limited to about 2 hours ---- with a 3hr practice everyday, I could easily go 4 hrs on a gig day
     
  8. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Re: Is it possible to get to a level of playing to the point where your chops never t

    KT, I can advise you to use my own same 2 hour "lip time" practice schedule, where I play (lip time) 30 minutes, rest 15 minutes, and then resume to lip time for 30 minutes more alternating for 2 hours lip time or more. All the students I tutor are on a 20 minute cycle of each.
     
  9. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Re: Is it possible to get to a level of playing to the point where your chops never t

    I've given a lot of thought about the genre of bluegrass as is one of the 3 genres well established and liked in the area where I live, but I can't wrap my head around anything brass in the treble clef that comes close to the sound expected. Tempo is not a problem. Wish my fiddling grandfather was still alive as he could break strings with it, they got so hot.
     
  10. Dr.Mark

    Dr.Mark Mezzo Forte User

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    Re: Is it possible to get to a level of playing to the point where your chops never t

    Hi Ed Lee,
    Bluegrass is Bach for mountain folk. Here's how I got started:
    Get some Flatts and Scruggs and work on playing the banjo part note for note. Foggy Mountain Breakdown is their most popular and its a good song for trumpet. This works well since the banjo isn't known for it's chord playing. Basically it's a single note type instrument and if you can hum the melody of Foggy Mountain, you can play it.. Also, Nickel Creek is great fun to play along with. Is it hard, well yes! but when you can join in with the mandolin player and match him note for note, that feels pretty good. It's great ear training and hard as heck when you first start but soon you'll learn common bluegrass patterns and things will get easier.
    Hope this helps
    Dr.Mark
    P.S.
    You'll never survive if you use a stiff tongue on this stuff. Loose is the name of the game.
     

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