Is language a factor?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Principaltrumpet, Jun 26, 2007.

  1. RG111

    RG111 Piano User

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    Nov 12, 2003
    Robin,

    Great post as usual!!!

    Roy
     
  2. stchasking

    stchasking Forte User

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    Jun 11, 2006
    The harshness detector is on.

    I think languages that roll their r's may have a slight advantage.
    Dave Hickman includes flutter tonguing in his students exercises. Pretty close to rolling an r.
     
  3. FreshBrewed

    FreshBrewed Mezzo Piano User

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    Nov 11, 2003
    Houston, TX
    I couldn't agree with you more. Well said.
     
  4. _TrumpeT_

    _TrumpeT_ Piano User

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    Apr 26, 2006
    I agree with Robin. I believe that Ye Shu Han expressed the idea that French had easier time learning to double tongue as their ku is more like que which helped to bring the tongue forward. Read the interview with Vincent Cichowicz and he shares his experience of teaching a Japanese player who could not pronounce tu (at least not in the way English speaking people do) and had hard time learning to articulate clearly.
     
  5. BergeronWannabe

    BergeronWannabe Piano User

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    Feb 6, 2007
    BRAVO! Well said...my point exactly!
     
  6. BergeronWannabe

    BergeronWannabe Piano User

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    Feb 6, 2007
    :D Ha! No kidding...people around here need to relax! Tension is a killer kids- long, deep breaths...
     
  7. Billy B

    Billy B Pianissimo User

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    Nov 5, 2004
    Des Moines, IA

    Not only will language affect articulation, but impediments will show up on the horn. I don't believe it is necessary to learn the language. Listen to the sound and copy.
     
  8. BergeronWannabe

    BergeronWannabe Piano User

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    Feb 6, 2007
    Excellent point! And take lessons from the best players/teachers available, so that you can learn how to do just that.
     
  9. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    The problem with this thread has actually NOTHING to do with language or articulation. Of course when we practice the things that we can't do, we will get better. Does our mother language shift the focus of what is easier for us until we have practiced and learned everything that there is to know? Yes - definitely. Especially in terms of articulation, sound, rhythmn and sense of melody.
    For any of you that do not fluently speak any foreign languages, I can only say, try it - you will like it. Communication is also what music is about. The better and more diverse your tools, the better the end product.
    Ever wonder why a lot of jazz musicians lived in Paris? It wasn't just opportunities to play. It was (is) a lifestyle that was very conducive to creativity. Melodies in the street which actually are just normal conversation....... There is so much to discover in this big world, if we just leave our eyes, ears and minds open.
     
  10. Puffy A

    Puffy A Pianissimo User

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    Jun 21, 2006
    Brooklyn
    Rowuk... Both posts in this thread seem spot on!!!
     

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