Is leaving you trumpet on a stand all the time bad for the finish

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by coolerdave, Jun 4, 2012.

  1. SmoothOperator

    SmoothOperator Mezzo Forte User

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    Jul 14, 2010
    I think there is some truth to this. My wife has taken to leaving her silver flute out for convenience sake, and it does seem to tarnish much faster. However on the bright side, you can easily reverse the tarnish reaction via the aluminum, baking soda and warm water method so, you don't need to give up convenience of having the horn out, but you might have to get motivated to have a bright shiny horn.
     
  2. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    DO NOT advise your wife to soak her flute in an aluminum baking soda solution unless you want to pay to have a tech re-pad it and possibly replace/restore the assembly. How much a tech charges vary, so I won't specifically quote, but my tech charged $100 for new pads and assembly alignment for my daughters flute, but that was 8 years ago.
     
  3. SmoothOperator

    SmoothOperator Mezzo Forte User

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    I took the pads off and reassembled it, prior to soaking. A bit tricky but nothing that can't be figured out with a little patience.
     
  4. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    There are spring steel very fragile wires inside the control assembly tubes that DO NOT TAKE KINDLY TO ANY MOISTURE. If you can totally take a flute apart and reassemble it accurately it's possible that you could become a reed tech's apprentice but there's still a heck of a lot more to flute repair. I consider myself lucky to take one out of its case and make sure the 4 parts are put together right. Did I trick you? The fourth piece is the crown that is usually attached when in the case, but never be surprised to find it missing among public school students. Yeah, them pads have got to make a perfect seal and not too tight or the back pressure may misalign other keys. Buy a new flute when you drop one from 2nd floor window onto concrete. I saw it happen! The cost of repairs to it in the early "50s exceeded the cost of a new flute.
     
  5. SmoothOperator

    SmoothOperator Mezzo Forte User

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    Mind you I wasn't soliciting to do it for others, and after I reattached the pads and de-tarnished it I am pretty sure I could flip the flute I paid $75 for $400, though I think it is better to keep since I won't be purchasing a $400 flute any time soon.

    The point is that keeping it out of the case seemed to accelerate the tarnishing, and that the tarnishing is reversible with no damage to the instrument.
     
  6. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    I wouldn't bet on your flipping estimated sale price unless they were high quality. I've had several Gemeinhardt, Armstrong and Artley I've bought for $75 and less, had them professionally rehabbed and the best price I sold one for was $300.
     

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