Is rubbing alcohol harmful to silver?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Jorto131, Jun 25, 2011.

  1. Jorto131

    Jorto131 New Friend

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    May 19, 2011
    Hello, a member of my family was sent to the hospital with a staph infection and the doctor said the entire family needs to be treated and the household needs to be treated as well. Since I play my trumpet daily I need to cleanse that as well. We are using rubbing alcohol on all hard surfaces within the house but I wasn't sure if it would mess up my horn. The finish is silver. If rubbing alcohol is not safe please suggest an alternative. Thank you.
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    If the horn is silver plated, the alcohol will evaporate and leave no residue or tarnish. Wait a while for it to evaporate before you play. The taste of rubbing alcohol makes playing no fun.

    This will not get the inside of our trumpet clean however. A better bet is a hot soapy bath and a good bore brush.
     
  3. Jorto131

    Jorto131 New Friend

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    May 19, 2011
    Ok, Thank you.
     
  4. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    Jorto - just a thought - avoid naked flames too. :D
     
  5. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    IMO ask the Doctor for his recommendation for the household cleaning liquid necessary. They don't use rubbing alchohol in the hospital for this purpose. There are infections around today that are life threatening. I'm even suggesting surgical gloves and a mask as you clean and disinfect. Worst case scenario you don't want to read or think about but the cost of a biological hazmat team is beyond belief. If the patient has been put in hospital isolation I hope you realize how serious this is. A trumpet can be autoclaved and restored ... your life cannot.
     
  6. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Isopropyl Alcohol at 91% is clinically proven to remove bacteria and fungus causing respiratory irritation. It will not harm the silver.
     
  7. simso

    simso Pianissimo User

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    Perfectly fine for silver, but I would avoid using it prolonged on any lacquered surfaces, it will soften them.
     
  8. Jorto131

    Jorto131 New Friend

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    May 19, 2011
    Thank you ed for your concern but rubbing alcohol was recommended,also my family is not in any danger because we are merely carriers of the virus; or people who have contracted the virus but do not show symptoms of it. the reason we are cleansing ourselves and the household is because we are a danger to others who come in contact with us and also, we don't want to be in quarantine hahaha
     
  9. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    A staph infection is not a virus, it is a bacteria. Antibiotics are NOT necessary to give to entire family members. MRSA is a staph bacteria called S. aureus that has seen an antibiotic or two too many BECAUSE PHYSICIANS ARE PERSCRIBING THIS FOR ENTIRE FAMILY MEMBERS THAT A PATIENT BEING DISCHARGED FROM THE HOSPITAL JUST SO HAPPENS TO HAVE. AND BECAUSE PHYSICIANS ARE PERSCRIBING ANTIBIOTICS FOR THE COMMON COLD!

    Ok end of this rant, I'm taking a deep breath as good trumpet players do, now let's continue.

    This bacteria is hard to eradicate from the nose (the organ really carrying this bacteria), but there is a special spray that has been shown to be effective. I do not recommend giving this to all in the family.

    Now let me debunk what you have been told by the health care professionals in your life. I am a pediatrician (as well as internist) but we are particularly aggressive at protecting our little patients. The Pediatric Red Book from the American Academy of Pediatrics states the following recommendations related that MOST PROTECTED environment called the "day care" where kids are in close contact and sharing secretions liberally: "Children with S. aureus colonization or infection should not be excluded routinely from child care or school settings." Now we don't want to hurt our kiddies, do we?

    There, you have seen it here on a Trumpet site, the sky IS NOT falling and there is no protective measures necessary. This is because community-associated S. aureus infection cannot be prevented, because the organism is ubiquitous and there is no vaccine. Focusing on good hand hygiene and wound care is effective at limiting transmission of S. arueus and preventing spread of infections in community settings.

    And let's teach our kids the falling valuable lesson from Saturday Night Live: You can pick your own nose and a friend can pick the friend's nose, but you cannot pick your friends nose.

    That's it, and I'm outta here.
     
  10. Jorto131

    Jorto131 New Friend

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    May 19, 2011


    The CDC states that the entire family disinfecting themselves and the surroundings is standard procedure when one or more members of that particular family have an infection. Also only the member who had the infection takes the antibiotics while the rest are just using medical grade soap to bathe in and taking nasal gel.
     

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