Is sound a gift or can it be perfected?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Tarter_trpt8, Feb 14, 2005.

  1. Kristine

    Kristine New Friend

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    Nov 3, 2004
    Texas
    That is so cool! When I was little I was taught that the most important thing is your sound. So doing longtones for a good thirty to forty five minutes before studying etudes is what I've done since eighth grade. The way I did my longtones was chromatically, counting on what octave I want to work on whether it be the lower or the higher. Then do octaves. Ex. E to E. While doing this, listening to your sound making sure it's crisp and clear and that you don't have the sound of a pond in your horn. Also while doing longtones making sure the transition to each note is played with ease, even though it can be friggin' hard. You could also just do longtones playing your scale, playing each note until it is in perfect pitch, clear, and awesome. I should try the mirror thing at home. You can work hard to have a great sound, and it can come naturally. It counts with the muscles of your mouth. Oh yeah make sure the air is taken in the diaphragm and that you have good support. (Kinda like the opera singers who have tremendous support)
     
  2. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Uhh, Kristine...

    We have to talk.

    The air is NOT taken in the diaphragm. The diaphragm is a dome-shaped muscle that serves as a floor for your lungs and heart, mostly. That same floor serves as a ceiling for your guts and stomach and all that other lovely stuff.

    When the brain sends the signal to breathe, the diaphragm contracts, the lungs expand, and your belly gets bigger because it's making room for your lungs which are expanding along with your chest. That's why you don't have ribs in front of your belly. WHEN YOU EXHALE the belly goes in, making you look kind of like an hourglass as you blow out. Support is motion (never stiffness) during exhalation NOT during inhalation.

    The diaphragm has no capability to store inhaled air as it is just a sheet of muscle. Only the lungs, trachea, esophagus, stomach, and oral cavity do (well, the intestines can, too, but that can be a trifle indelicate for this conversation).

    I'm glad we could have this little talk.

    ML
     
  3. Kristine

    Kristine New Friend

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    Nov 3, 2004
    Texas
    :cry: I'm sorry, I meant belly. I'm an idiot.
     
  4. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Kristine,

    Don't feel bad.

    I've known people twice and thrice your age that make the same error. I didn't understand any of that stuff until I was in my thirties! It's complex, there are myriad misconceptions, and the misconceptions just get repeated until they're "true".

    The body lies. It tells you one thing that you feel or see when the truth is different, bio-mechanically. From the way the belly expands, you'd almost believe that the lungs are where your stomach are!

    So, again, don't feel bad.

    ML
     
  5. HoosierDaddy

    HoosierDaddy Pianissimo User

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    Feb 10, 2005
    Manny
    I liked your post. I agree totally. Because there is no direct way to control the diaphram because it is an involuntary muscle, I tell students when they mention they are using diaphram, to try to move there pancreas. Of course thay cannot. This often helps them get the idea that they should never think about it again.
    HD
     
  6. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    HD,

    I'm glad you said pancreas and not bowel!

    ML
     

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