Is tarnished silver stronger than untarnished silver?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by limepickle, Jul 26, 2015.

  1. limepickle

    limepickle Piano User

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    I didn't really know which category to put this in. I've noticed that silver plating seems to wear off a lot less/ not at all
    once it is heavily oxidized. Is what I'm noticing actually happening, or am I mistaken?
     
  2. bumblebee

    bumblebee Fortissimo User

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  3. J. Jericho

    J. Jericho Fortissimo User

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    Hmmm... I can visualize an entirely black silver plated horn deliberately oxidized to reduce wear/maintenance and have a distinctive appearance.
     
  4. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Alas, Schilkes turn brown....
     
  5. limepickle

    limepickle Piano User

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    Thanks bumblebee,

    I probably should have been more diligent with my google search.
     
  6. gunshowtickets

    gunshowtickets Forte User

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    I've noticed the heavily tarnished mp's with that color case hardened-looking tarnish seem to be a bit more slippy, and seemed to be a little more scratch resistant. Forgive me if I'm not willing to test out.
    I just took two of them and did the bakingsoda/salt/aluminum foil/boiling water trick.
    Worked like a charm.
     
  7. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    These days I'm of the belief that the thin, epoxy resin "lacquer" finishes are superior to silver plate. It's an interesting idea to allow a horn to be pre-oxidized from the factory, but isn't part of the purpose of fine silver plate also the appearance of the instrument itself?

    My next trumpet won't be silver plated, unless of course I wind up with another Schilke - then I don't have a lot of choice in the matter.
     
  8. bumblebee

    bumblebee Fortissimo User

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    Hi Patrick, I've had recent experience of a new trumpet which had lacquer and not silver plate, and it didn't last - started rubbing away pretty much anywhere I had been touching despite the care I took of it, and within a few months. It wasn't a cheap trumpet, so I would have hoped the lacquer job would have been better than average. A vintage horn I had relacquered a year and a half ago because the old lacquer was flaking off too much has been absolutely fine, in line with your description of the thin epoxy resin types. So I think not all modern (or new) lacquer finishes are equal, but I don't know what question to ask to be sure of the quality of one horn's finish over another.

    --bumblebee
     
  9. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    I'm from the generation that chose bright silver plate over lacquer (and satin silver) to prove our instrument was worthy of being played by professionals. (In college, I played for a Pete Barbutti demo, and his first comment was "Must be professional trumpet-players--their instruments are silver." Had a blast on that date.)

    Later I moved to the "If it is ugly, the trumpet must play really well," phase.
     
  10. Tomaso

    Tomaso Pianissimo User

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    Tarnished (oxidized) silver is more wear resistant than polished silver, and its presence prevents the further loss of silver beneath it.
    I like it. It doesn't make my hands black.
    T/
     

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