Is this possible?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by BigDub, Sep 23, 2014.

  1. veery715

    veery715 Utimate User

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    I remember a youtube from about a year ago of a latino player in LA (I think), who played a full diatonic scale with no valves. I can't remember his name, though.
     
  2. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    My Dad? Absolutely - that guy was an uncanny marksman, and had the trophies to prove it. Growing up with the guy I saw him make some really remarkable shots with rifles, pistols and shotguns, so it was possible, but that's just not how it happened.

    Personally, I don't believe it's possible to play a 2 octave chromatic scale with no valves in that range. In that range there is only so far one can bend a note before it slips to another partial.
     
  3. neal085

    neal085 Mezzo Forte User

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    Maybe he played the scale with no valves.

    Ed McGivern could shoot coins out of the air with a .38 Special.

    Oh, and here's a crazy Asian chick that flips bowls on her head while riding a unicycle.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b5MjD3TYVzo

    The only people who likely even care are people who have tried unsuccessfully to ride a unicycle while flipping bowls on their heads. I happen to not fall into that category.

    Just sayin'......
     
  4. Phil986

    Phil986 Forte User

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    Not physically impossible but the likelihood that a small town police officer will grab a live skunk renders the overall probability of the event small enough to be negligible. They do know better. Those who don't get selected for animal control positions... :D
     
  5. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Well, as I was told by my band director, Walter H. Cameron, who played in Sousa's 2nd band, as he was told by other Sousa bandsmen, Clarke was a pompous a** who himself was prone to exaggerate his prowess in music. There are some who have said he paid others to prepare his music lesson book only to elevate his self esteem among the musicians market. Having others compose music to be published under your name was not an uncommon practice. Edward T. Paull's is the most prolific I know of. Even while Irving Berlin is known to play tunes on his custom modified piano, it is said that he had to have a musician put the music on paper, and there were many others that could do that.

    Now I'm not saying Herbert L. Clarke couldn't play his cornet, but I don't have the evidence that he could even read music, and we all know many can play their instruments by ear. However, it is my own thought despite his own acumen, renown and acquired fame that he should have kept playing the viola where he more likely learned the basics of music. Still, methinks he only arranged a variant of Carnival of Venice and did not compose the original.
     
  6. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    The worst is that if one grabs a skunk by its tail, one best know which end emits the spray of an obnoxious odor.
     
  7. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Oh it happened - he wasn't keen on doing it, but the folks in the neighborhood would not be dissuaded. It's not like he grabbed and held on - he grabbed it, whipped it down the alley, and fired - it probably took all of about 2 seconds total. And of course the skunk ended up spraying anyway, stinking the place up, and making a nice fun job for Dad who had to load it in the trunk of the police car and drive it out in the country to dispose of it. (IIRC they at least stuck it in a plastic trash bag before doing that, not that it helped much. :D)
     
  8. gordonfurr1

    gordonfurr1 Forte User

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    I could on a SLIDE trumpet...teehee.
     
  9. musicalmason

    musicalmason Forte User

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    I'm going to call bs on another level. In 1932, it had been 10 years since he had recorded anything, but he didn't stop playing. He wasn't performing much, but he would occasionally. Plus, he had a very active teaching studio, where he demonstrated things regularly. So, while he hadn't recorded in 10 years, it's not like he hadn't touched the horn in that long.

    Maybe this happened, maybe not. But the story has some holes in it.
     
  10. Dean_0

    Dean_0 Piano User

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    And, as a matter of fact so did the skunk. ROFL:laughwave::shhh:

    Dean_0
     

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