It took a while but I finally think in concert pitch.

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by ckkphoto, Mar 17, 2013.

  1. ckkphoto

    ckkphoto Pianissimo User

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    I am sure everyone who plays trumpet thinks C in b flat pitch. At least to start with. This really set me back years ago when I was in acapella choir because I was always one step off. To play the trumpet you have to "think" the note you are going to hit (preaching to the choir) and then relax and play it. When I first started playing a C trumpet this was a big obstacle because I kept thinking in b flat. Since I have started practicing again I have done 90 percent plus of my time on the C instrument. Finally I am thinking in concert pitch. I have no trouble going back down to b flat instrument. It is like slipping on a favorite old jacket. Because I like playing baroque music I am eventually wanting to get a piccolo and an Eb trumpet...wonder how hard that adjustment is going to be. :-P
     
  2. barliman2001

    barliman2001 Fortissimo User

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    From C to Eb - not too bad. The big step is to the picc... that one wants lots of preparation, and almost every one does it too early - me included. Makes for unnecessary mistakes and frustrations.
     
  3. ckkphoto

    ckkphoto Pianissimo User

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    I would be curious to know. What mistakes and frustrations? It is likely I will jump into a picc too early. Probably sometime this year or next...or if I find a deal I can't pass up.
     
  4. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Relative pitch fits as well. For instance, when I am with my relatives, I often pitch a fit.
     
  5. ckkphoto

    ckkphoto Pianissimo User

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    My dad used to say money was relative...the more money you had the more relatives would show.
     
  6. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Both of these last two posts comprise the essential elements of what I call the theory of relativity.
     
  7. barliman2001

    barliman2001 Fortissimo User

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    Mistake #1: Just buying a picc without experienced advice and your own experience. That will lead you to a series of buys and re-sells, and if you're lucky, you might find that the first picc you bought was the perfect one - only you sold it two years previous... (I made that mistake several times: I had a 1971 Selmer picc, did not feel comfy with it, gave it to a friend for his 16th birthday. He's still playing it, but he moved to Ireland so that hooter is out of reach for me. A few years back, I had a Besson Kanstul picc and traded that in for the Stomvi Elite - which is nice, but not so individual in tone as the Besson. By this time, I know enough about picc playing not to make too many mistakes, and I would dearly like to get that Besson Kanstul back... but it can't be traced, and I haven't seen another)
    Mistake #2: Go for one of the cheap new piccs that overflow e-bay. Total waste of money.

    Frustration #1: Having a picc, and not getting a proper tone out of it. I'll explain: When playing a biggie Bb, you can get by on your lazy days (if you're not playing lead) by just pumping air into it somehow, without proper body stance and tension etc. Try that on a picc -any picc - and it will sound like a hoover on steroids.
    Frustration #2: You have done a certain amount of work on the picc, and feel it sounds fine, and then you have your first solo performance on that tricky little machine. When you leave the venue incognito (it always helps) you will hear some rather scary comments - the picc will sound very differently in your ear than in the hall.
    So my advice would be: Work your way upward from the Bb via C and Eb, perhaps try and borrow a high F for a time, and then select your picc mpc (which is all important!!) and get your npicc.
     
  8. ckkphoto

    ckkphoto Pianissimo User

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    thank you! I appreciate the input. AND it gives me an excuse to get an Eb!
     
  9. veery715

    veery715 Utimate User

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    ehh, Bb or C, it's the THINKING part which causes trouble. I don't bother with it.
     
  10. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    My trumpet professor had us immerse ourselves in the C trumpet (except Stage Band) and playing Barnum and Bailey's Favorite on C was a challenge. It got to the point that I'd look at a clock and transpose an hour down.

    I do, however, think the piccolo is the next step. Chicowitz liked starting his students on the "A" side because it was lower. My teacher started us on the Bb side because of our Bb ears, but the piccolo can be a nasty little beast at first. We (as noted above) tend to either play with lazy air or attack it like a Bb playing lead.

    It is neither of the above: the piccolo will multiply our mistakes by a factor of two. If you get a piccolo, pull out a beginning method and work through it. Practice lip slurs and such, and tonguing too. Stay away from playing tunes for a while and tame the beast. Challenging but fun.

    The Eb turns out to be an unneeded instrument. Anything written for Eb trumpet can be played on the Bb, C or piccolo.

    Play some weddings and you can pay off the piccolo pretty quickly.

    Have fun!
     

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