It was the best of times; It was the worst of times

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Dark Knight, Oct 30, 2010.

  1. Dark Knight

    Dark Knight Pianissimo User

    187
    3
    Apr 7, 2010
    Canada
    It was the best of times: I had my second lesson with a "real professional" trumpet player. What a world of difference it makes to talk with, play with and learn from a trumpet player. Until now, it has been music lessons with the trumpet (which is great too), but I have mostly been on my own to figure things out. We are now using Don Johnson's book who I will get to meet soon, and the Schlossberg book.

    It was the worst of times: Riding high from the experience, I must not have been careful to fully clasp the locks on the case for my 1974 Bach Stad (ML37). When I step out of the car, I watch the case pop open and in slow motion (relatively speaking) saw my trumpet tumble out the case and the bell hit the curb. I did not cry but...... I am now playing a beat-up Blessing student rental while my baby is in the shop. Guess what everybody? I sound EXACTLY the same on either trumpet.

    It was the best of times: When I walked into the house and got on the computer and received news that super dirt cheap, mint condition Mt. Vernon Bach 3C was still available; it should arrive next week. After reading the many posts and history on TM, I wanted a 3C with the bite of 5C and that was recommended. We'll see.

    It was the best of times: The slight embouchure change two weeks after my first lesson has made all the difference in the world. Not in terms of range or endurance. It has made a world of difference in terms of ease of playing; it is less difficult. The lips don't get tired but the corners do. If I miss a note it is not because the lips have given out, it is because the muscle are actually getting tired. No jaw pain in two weeks, either. I have to once again give a shout out to Markie. In band practice, I do not have time to "fuss" with lip and mouthpiece placement before the baton comes down after a rest or at the beginning of a piece. I just imagine "blowing out a candle" then planting the MP, anchored by the lower lip. That has helped hugely.

    Thanks.


    To bend quote from Meatloaf: "I guess three out four ain't bad".

    Thanks for reading,

    DK
     
  2. SmoothOperator

    SmoothOperator Mezzo Forte User

    857
    46
    Jul 14, 2010
    I have recently had my third lesson from a pro too. I found the first lesson disrupted what I was doing previously quite a bit, so much so that at the second lesson I was doing severely worse, but by the third practice the things that he said were starting to make sense and now my endurance range and tone yes even tone are far improved.

    It seems like chops are a tricky thing, because the muscles themselves change the shape of my lips as they gain strength, so I have to go back and relearn my basic embouchure and re coordinate everything.
     
  3. trumpetgirl13

    trumpetgirl13 New Friend

    37
    0
    Oct 6, 2010
    Hamilton
    Small world. Don Johnson was my private teacher in college....
     
  4. Dark Knight

    Dark Knight Pianissimo User

    187
    3
    Apr 7, 2010
    Canada
    You can not imagine how jealous I am. You are so very, very fortunate.

    DK
     
  5. trumpetgirl13

    trumpetgirl13 New Friend

    37
    0
    Oct 6, 2010
    Hamilton
    he was a great fundamentals teacher I can say that. I still use his technique book everyday for practising.

    I'm gonna make you a little more jealous by telling you the gig bag I have he gave to me - someone had hand made it for him but he wanted me to have it!
     
  6. Brekelefuw

    Brekelefuw Fortissimo User

    3,187
    977
    Mar 21, 2006
    Toronto
    I think Don has become the southern Ontario Guru. I have never studied with someone who hasn't studied with him directly or uses his methods.
     

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