It's summer, and I have no music. What do I do?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Rainiac, Jul 26, 2010.

  1. Rainiac

    Rainiac New Friend

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    Earth. For sure.
    I've been practicing scales for about half an hour, and I can't do this anymore. Everyday, scales. I've done a little improv on them, but I need SONGS! I have a terrible ear, you see, but I would love to develop it. What I want is to hear a song and then play it, sans music, but I'm wellllll aware that that doesn't just happen. So, what DO I do? Especially when a song's melody is not on a trumpet. And, if anyone has something fun for me to play or try, I'd love to hear about it :)
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Go to church, talk to the pastor and borrow a hymnbook. 700+ catchy tunes suitable for folk, rock, jazz or classical interpretation. They can be used to develop transposition skills and when mastered help develop your first real audience. There is no bigger collection that I know of.

    Most important: they stress the range where we we can make the most music. One thing to remember - practice with care, God is listening!
     
  3. Alex_C

    Alex_C Piano User

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    My trumpet book has all kindsa songs, sure they're not always ones I know, but they're at least songs. "Ol Blue" isn't the version on the radio, but it's a start, a lot of the other songs are familiar. "Farm Out" is "old MacDonald" in realty, farm out lol - when I was a kid my friends and I would say "farm out" for "far out".

    Can you get a trumpet book anywhere? Book stores have them at times, amazon etc. As always Rowuk's idea is EXCELLENT.
     
  4. rettepnoj

    rettepnoj Fortissimo User

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  5. Mambo King

    Mambo King Pianissimo User

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    Get one or more of the Sher "New Real Books" or a songbook from your library. There are plenty of books of transcribed solos too.
     
  6. Glennx

    Glennx Pianissimo User

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    Rowuk is right about a hymnal having a zillion tunes, so you'll never be lacking for music to play and it might be a good way to get Easter gigs ("Go ahead: pick a tune, any tune...").

    I think you also want to develop your ear training ie. the ability to hear a tune, recognize the intervals and structure it's based on, and then be able to play it on your horn. Most of us just sit down one day and try to learn a melody or a lick off a record or (these days) a CD. In my case it started when I was in grade 10, wanting to be able to play along with the trumpet solo that leads off the old Chicago tune "Does Anybody Really Know What Time it Is?" from their first album in 1969.

    If you celebrate Christmas, there must easily be 25+ XMas tunes you can hum without really trying. Take one and start trying to figure it out on your horn in an easy key, like F. Once you've got it, try it in G, then C, and so on. It's a slow process but really worthwhile. Eventually you'll get so you can start figuring them out in your head (along with the appropriate fingerings) while you do dishes or wait for the bus. Or try popular or folk tunes like London Bridge, Pop Goes The Weasel, My Bonnie, etc.

    Another thing you might consider is to take an ear training course (aka solfege, or 'sightsinging') at your local college. Most of my university classmates hated, it but I found it to be absolutely one of the most useful things I learned and mastered.

    Enjoy, good luck, and persevere.
     
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2010
  7. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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  8. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    There are tons of song books for trumpet out there. Look up, Hal Leonard, Alfred Publishing, Mel Bay, Carl Fischer, Music Minus One, Amsco. These are just a few resources
     
  9. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    How about turning on some music of your favorite stuff and playing along to it? You'll improve your ear and your improvisation skills in a hurry doing that.
     
  10. oldenick

    oldenick Pianissimo User

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