I've Found The Answer

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by erd402, Dec 18, 2010.

  1. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    IMO, music seems to attract the "vendors" of illicit drugs, thus exposure enhances propensity. Music is itself a form of escapism I find. Add to this the availability of alchohol and the nearness of the opposite sex ... then IT happens.

    The propensity of criminal activity rises to the highest of the U.S. --- the Office of the President of The United States vis President Nixon. Don't demean yourself by involvement in such!
     
  2. Trumpet Dreamer

    Trumpet Dreamer Mezzo Forte User

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    Not to mention the Oval Office and a stained blue dress, plus a few cigars!

    This President gave a whole new meaning to the phrase..."Close, but no cigar!"
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2010
  3. glorybe

    glorybe Piano User

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    Or, to say it concisely musicians often work in night clubs. What else is a bar about than booze,dope and sex?
     
  4. Trumpet Dreamer

    Trumpet Dreamer Mezzo Forte User

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    Your observation is correct. However, it appears a number of musicians (both pros and at the college level) lack the will power to avoid getting into trouble in this area.

    I'm thankful for a great wife who has been a most positive influence on me for many years.
     
  5. glorybe

    glorybe Piano User

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    These days education is on the verge of understanding a new concept. It has become exposed due to some remarkable people with disabilities. We've all seen Rain Man. The guys brain is fantastic in some areas as the energy and abilities have developed in the regions of the brain that worked well while other areas were less than average.
    You see the same thing in college. Some freshmen and sophomores are pushing hard to develop in their fields and their general aspect becomes freakish, awkward and downright stupid. Sophomoric behavior has earned a place in our language. There is one mental disability (William's Disease I think) where musical ability is unusually high. I think what we may be seeing are people with unusual musical intelligence whose brains can not function in normal mode well due to so much energy being used in the areas occupied with music. That may actually make them vulnerable to feeling some discomfort and feel a need to use drugs or alcohol. There is even a polarity in music. The two most common place to run into performing musicians are bars and churches. The musicians who perform in churches tend not to be involved in playing in bars and visa-versa.
     
  6. Mark B

    Mark B Pianissimo User

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    Maybe because among other things, musicians tend to be obsessive compulsive in nature.

    Mark
     
  7. incredibleman

    incredibleman New Friend

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    Maybe musicians tend to be a little more sensitive... maybe they have a lower ability to tolerate the mundane, and a higher need for meaning, purpose, beauty, and excitement?

    I am a comeback player, and I don't practice because I am required, expected, or paid to. I practice for no other reason than I have come to love the trumpet and the music a good player can create with one. And as a consequence I practice longer and more effectively than I ever did as a child (when I "had to"). You can do a lot of things well in life if you just expect yourself to "do things well", but I think the odds of being really excellent go way up if you have a passion for it.

    That doesn't mean there will ever be any money in it though...
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2010
  8. glorybe

    glorybe Piano User

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    You hit a note with me! From the third grade on I was trained to play in large bands. We were taught to practice in the old formal style. And I did my practice instead of avoiding it. I enjoyed playing with large bands and usually held first chair. But I was being sold a bill of goods in a way. For big bands a solo has a lot of accompaniment. Stand alone solos are rare as hens teeth. I found great value later in life of playing a ton of stand alone solos daily. It does make a difference. For example when it comes to being on pitch you have to hear and attack that pitch yourself without any other persons input for a base line. You develop better pitch control for sure. And timing issues as well as cadence are also all from within. When playing old tunes there is no real reference to how the artist played them and words like slow have a very broad meaning. By hammering a tune dozens of times eventually one can sort of know what the composer meant by slow. They just didn't get into beats per minute back in the day. In this regard trumpet players are in luck. The trumpet is one instrument for which a great variety of stand alone solos are available. For low brass it is almost essential to learn treble clef and be able to use trumpet or cornet scores as so little is out there for instruments like the American baritone or true euphonium. And finding well written jazz scores for an E flat tuba will take a while as well.
     
  9. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    For sure, President Clinton wasn't about to give away any of his illegal Cuban cigars!
     
  10. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    I concur! Likewise in my early training we weren't exposed to the metronome or to numerical tempos. Initially, we performed to the Director's baton tempo. However, a pure unaccompanied soloist is pretty much at liberty to interpret tempo however they want in the absense of other guidance. Even the word on a chart allows quite a bit of latitude.

    When I made my recording of Stars and Stripes, Forever! absent any guidance my track time is precisely the same as the recording of it by the U.S. Marine Band "President's Own" and I didn't have drums or someone waving a stick at me to provide tempo. Too, since I didn't play a C piccolo, I transposed that part for my Bb piccolo trumpet, and it kind of irks me that the Marine rendition wipes out the reprise of the piccolo part in the finale with a crescendo of basses and drums, when Sousa never wrote for a crescendo conclusion.
     

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