Jeff Smiley´s "Flat chin"

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Sofus, Nov 19, 2008.

  1. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    The "Flat Chin" approach has been recommended in a couple of recent postings.

    Bumping this thread just as a reminder that this terminology is quite confusing (is it a muscular movement, a lower jaw movement or a bit of both?), and that maybe the classic Farkas method doesn't suit everybody.

    Silver bullet?
     
  2. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    Flat chin to me was always refered to as a Farkas embouchure.
     
  3. Jerry Freedman

    Jerry Freedman Piano User

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    Seems to me that if you really try to flatten your chin, you would be pulling the skin tight across your chin bone ( not really anatomically correct term) which would stretch things more than needed and could add to tension. If, however, you used your corners as advocated by most teachers, and avoided bunching then the chin would be flat and relaxed.
     
  4. Jerry Freedman

    Jerry Freedman Piano User

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    What about corners
     
  5. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    There are players that can excel with a bunched chin. Lynn Nicholson and Bill Watrous come to mind. For the player with an overbite, however, bunching the chin can cause all kinds of problems. More often than not the lower lip will get tucked behind the upper lip, resulting in a thin sound, lack of range and accuracy can suffer. The chops as a whole are very unstable. I hate to look at playing from a physical standpoint and perhaps one of our tame doctors can chime in, but I've discovered that the muscles involved in playing pedal tones in tune are the same ones that keep high notes from choking off.

    My take on embouchure is that an inverse triangle is involved, formed between the corners and chin. This helps provide me with a stable and consistent isometric framework for my chops.
     
  6. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Don't know why. In his books, he shows a variety of embouchures, some fairly bizarre looking.
     
  7. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    Sorry, I wasn't referencing Smiley's book, just what I had been told by my director in high school. I've only read excerpts and that was 7-8 years ago.
     

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